Asheville Neighborhoods

Spotlight on Asheville Neighborhoods: Five Points and UNC-Asheville

UNC Asheville Campus

In a triangle tucked between the Merrimon and Broadway Avenue corridors, just north of downtown Asheville, is the neighborhood known collectively as Five Points and UNC-Asheville. Lining the cluster of prime residential homes that makes up Five Points are an array of businesses – groceries, spas, coffee shops, bed and breakfast inns – all easily accessible by foot. The Five Points and UNC-Asheville area features a range of 1920s and ’30s bungalows mixed with a growing number of modern-style residences, making a stroll through the streets a feast for the eyes.

Five Points Neighborhood AshevilleBordering the north end of Five Points is the University of North Carolina at Asheville (the only dedicated liberal arts institution in the UNC system and home to an array of events open to the public), the regionally renowned North Asheville Tailgate Market, and the beautiful Botanical Gardens at Asheville. The USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station Headquarters is also located in the neighborhood.

A Walkable Asheville Neighborhood

High Five Coffee Shop AshevilleResidents of Five Points have the distinct privilege of being within walking distance of a collection of popular specialty grocery stores – Greenlife (Whole Foods), Trader Joe’s and Harris Teeter – along with favorite meeting spots Five Points Restaurant and High Five Coffee. Try the Diablo at High Coffee, pictured at left. At the tip of the triangle sits the Moog Music Factory, where the world-famous Moog Music synthesizers and other electronic musical instruments are designed and handcrafted, and where visitors can play the gear, or take a free factory tour to see employees at work building some of the most innovative instruments in the world. This walkable neighborhood boasts sidewalks lining many streets.

UNC-Asheville: An Asheville Community Gem

UNC-Asheville offers amazing resources not only for its students, but for the general public as well. The university sponsors a wide range of cultural and academic events, concerts, lectures, movie screenings and the like, both on campus and off, year-round. In addition, programs like the Family Business Forum and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute are specifically designed to educate and support the Asheville community.

Botanical Gardens of Asheville and Tailgate Market

Botanical Gardens AshevilleBordering the UNCA campus is the Botanical Gardens of Asheville, a 10-acre independent, non-profit botanical gardens dedicated to the study and promotion of the native plants and habitats of the Southern Appalachians. Admission is free, and the gardens boast trails lined with meandering creeks and stunning scenery perfect for spending a sunny afternoon.

The North Asheville Tailgate Market (whose 2017 season runs from April 1-Nov. 18) sets up shop on the UNCA campus every Saturday from 8 a.m. til noon. Since 1980, the market has provided visitors with a full range of local, sustainably produced produce, meats, eggs, cheeses, breads, plants, prepared foods and crafts. With more than 40 vendors and over 40,000 annual customers, the market’s energetic and warm environment exemplifies the celebrated diversity of Asheville’s community.

For a personally guided tour of the Five Points and UNCA area, or for more information on real estate here or anywhere in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

A Look Inside the Downtown Asheville Condo Life

Downtown Asheville Condo

The Downtown Asheville Lifestyle

Asheville Condo BalconyLiving in downtown Asheville is an exciting and convenient way of life, and given the growing number of refurbished and new condo buildings, it is an increasingly popular lifestyle as well. With dozens of incredible restaurants, bars, art galleries and entertainment merely steps away, there is never a dull moment.

Many of the amenities provided by these downtown condominiums are designed to accommodate a walkable lifestyle with easy access to all that you would need.  Features such as in-house gyms, storage closets, common areas and on-site parking help to make that lifestyle possible.

Newer Downtown Asheville Condos

Downtown Asheville CondoA number of new condominium buildings have cropped up in downtown Asheville in recent years, with many of them adopting a mixed-use model.  For example, 12 South Lexington and Lexington Station have commercial spaces on the ground level and multiple housing units in varying sizes above.

A hallmark of many of the newer condos is the use of balconies and terraces in most units. The luxury condos at both 60 North Market and 21 Battery Park feature terraces with sweeping views of the Blue Ridge Mountains.  They also both feature rooftop club houses for entertaining guests.

Refurbished Downtown Asheville Condos

Downtown Asheville CondoDowntown Asheville is known for its well-preserved historic district.  Many small independent businesses have moved into the ground floor units of these stunning buildings while the upper floors have turned into mixed use developments with offices as well as residences.

Buildings as old as the 1891 Oxford Place Condos have been refurbished and modernized, providing residences with tons of character and historic charm.  The Broadway Arts Building condos and Sawyer Motor Building Condos feature original hardwood floors and exposed brick walls alongside modern conveniences such as updated electric, plumbing and windows.

Many of these vintage condos have been carefully renovated to provide many of the community features desirable in newer condos as well. For example, 37 Hiawassee and the Kress Building condos have incorporated rooftop terraces for residents to take in the city views, and Ardmion Park, once known as the Sky Club, provides its residents with a community swimming pool and gardens overlooking the city.

For more information on real estate or living in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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4 Benefits of Buying a Historic Home in Asheville

Historic Home Kenilworth Asheville

Part of the wide appeal of Asheville is its aesthetic.  Though it is a small city, nestled among the ancient Blue Ridge Mountains, it draws in flocks of tourists.  Many of these tourists eventually make their way into the charming historic neighborhoods of Asheville and are drawn in by the architectural beauty of these well-preserved homes. This is evidenced by the quickly growing population and popularity of Asheville.

The Craftsmanship and Strength of Historic Homes is Unmatched

Unique Coffered Ceiling DesignOlder homes, particularly those that were built before World War 1, are typically built of much higher quality materials than newer homes.  You will often find rare hardwoods such as heart pine and wood from old-growth forests.  Rare gems such as copper adornments and opalescent glass exemplify the handmade nature of these buildings.

America is currently undergoing a type of downtown revival.  Residents and tourists alike are enjoying the cultural hub provided by historic centers.  Start-up businesses such as bookstores and restaurants are thriving in these historic locations.  Historic neighborhoods close to these city centers are increasingly appealing for their vibrancy and walkability.

Possible Tax Incentives

As of January of 2016, the North Carolina legislature has put into effect a historic rehabilitation tax credit program.  This program provides a great incentive to taxpayers who rehabilitate their homes or income-producing properties.  These incentives for improving historic structures are an important tool for historic preservation in North Carolina.  Additionally, a federal tax credit for the rehabilitation of historic homes consists of a 20% credit for qualifying income-producing historic properties that have been rehabilitated.

Adaptive Reuse is Environmentally Friendly

Far superior to demolition, the concept of adaptive reuse encourages people to preserve the structural assets in place.  This saves a lot of energy that goes into the manufacture, transportation and assembly of new building materials.  Historical buildings’ energy efficiency can always be improved upon, and the latest building technologies are making that increasingly easy.

You Are Preserving History

Ideal Yard for Pets and PlayAsheville is a place of deep-rooted history.  A small group of big-dreaming activists played a large role in helping to stop the demolition of many of downtown Asheville’s historic buildings to put in a strip mall.  Fortunately, they were able to stop the destruction, and preservationists stepped in with a Public Works program that encouraged business owners to preserve the historic buildings and create businesses within their walls.  Today, Asheville has a vibrant downtown and many of the businesses are housed in architecturally astounding structures.

Similarly, many devoted homeowners have moved into the many historic neighborhoods around Asheville, and with a little TLC, have preserved these stately homes.  Examples of this can bee seen in the Victorian and Queen Anne homes in Montford, pebble dash cottages in Biltmore Village, charming bungalows in West Asheville and Colonial Revival and Tudor homes of Grove Park, among many others.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Sources and Further Reading: National Trust for Historic Preservation 

Preservation North Carolina 

The Best-Kept-Secret Neighborhood in West Asheville: Malvern Hills

Malvern Hills Neighborhood Asheville

Just west of the desirable historic West Asheville neighborhood lies the quiet community of Malvern Hills.  This hidden gem of Asheville has a rich history and a vibrant community.  Additionally, as a part of West Asheville, it is a highly walkable community.

The History of Malvern Hills Neighborhood in Asheville

Beginning in the 1820s, people voyaged from the surrounding countryside to this area to enjoy the health benefits of the sulphur springs discovered in these hills by Robert Henry.  By the mid 1800s, as word of the healing waters spread, people would travel here to reap the benefits of the healing waters. They would stay in the Hotel Belmont, and later the Sulphur Springs Hotel, both of which stood in the center of what is now the neighborhood until they burned and were ultimately abandoned in 1891.  Remnants of the spring house can still be seen at the bottom of School Road.

The Landscape of Malvern Hills

Malvern Hills ArchitectureMalvern Hills neighborhood, bordered by Bear Creek Road on the east, Wendover Road on the south, and on the north by School Road, has just over 200 houses within its boundaries.  Patton Avenue provides quick access to downtown Asheville and I-40 while the western end of the neighborhood is bordered by Canie Creek.  This small creek winds through a large wooded tract of land where residents frequently spot deer, bear, and wild turkeys.  A strong movement is currently underway to secure a greenway along this creek.

Infrastructure and Architecture of Malvern Hills

Malvern Hills Community ParkMalvern Hills boasts one of the few areas in west Asheville to have sidewalks lining all roads, thus making it a pedestrian-friendly area. There are three community-maintained landscaped islands, one with a rose garden, where residents  congregate during neighborhood gatherings. Mature trees grace the hilly slopes of this area, and you may glimpse mountain views from some of the hilltops.  

The architecture is a pleasant mix of larger, stately 1920s homes, small bungalows, brick tudor cottages, and mid-century ranch houses.  The lots are of a generous size and are well-maintained.

For more information on neighborhoods and real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Further Reading:  A Brief History of Malvern Hills

Further Reading: A neighborhood Profile

 

 

Explore Historic Neighborhoods in Asheville

Montford Colonial Revival

Asheville, North Carolina is lucky to have a number of well-preserved historic districts among its many and varied neighborhoods.  Gorgeous examples of diverse styles of architecture are represented throughout these communities.  Many of them are graced with sidewalks, small businesses, public parks and are desirable for their walkability.

If you are considering buying an historic home for its aesthetic benefits and unmatched architecture, or simply curious about these majestic abodes, take a look the 8 historic neighborhoods featured here.

Historic Kenilworth

KenilworthThis lovely neighborhood sits perched atop some rolling hills just south of downtown Asheville.  Bungalows and other larger homes, mostly built in the 1920s, define the architectural style. There are also some prime examples of Spanish architecture found among the huge hardwoods.

The neighborhood’s location near the hospital, downtown Asheville and Biltmore Village make it convenient for many professionals.  There is also a public park and a small lake with peaceful views nestled in the center of the community.

Montford Historic District

MontfordThis centrally-located neighborhood is just a stone’s throw outside of downtown Asheville.  It had its heyday at the turn of the 20th century with many of the city’s professionals built large and colorful homes along the central corridor of Montford Avenue and its surrounding blocks.  

Today, some of the largest homes are now operating as bed and breakfast establishments, but most are still single family residences.  Homes in architectural styles such as Victorian, Queen Anne, Arts and Crafts and Neoclassical sit majestically overlooking the tree-lined streets.

Beaverdam

BeaverdamThe Beaverdam neighborhood is located in a gorgeous valley to the north of downtown.  The opening of the valley is conveniently located off of Merrimon Avenue, a straight shot into downtown and all of the conveniences it offers.  The back of the valley leads up to the Blue Ridge Parkway for easy access to hiking and biking in America’s most visited national park.

The historic homes in this valley are mostly a farmhouse style in a pastoral setting.  If you follow Beaverdam Road, parallel to Beaverdam Creek, you can glimpse some of these vintage farmhouses and cabins.

LakeView Park

Lake View ParkThis community of 485 homes surrounding Beaver Lake and Park in north Asheville has a blend of architectural styles and a good number of historical homes, built mostly in the 1920s, among the residences.  

The lake itself was created in 1923 by esteemed urban planner and architect John Nolen.  The lake and its surrounding trail system are privately owned and maintained by residents of Lakeview Park. This neighborhood offers proximity to downtown Asheville in balance with serene lakeside living.

 

Historic Grove Park Neighborhood

Grove ParkThis classic North Asheville neighborhood is known for its stately homes, Grove Park Inn golf course vistas and immaculately landscaped terraced yards.  Designed and developed by Edwin Wiley Grove, this area incorporates Neoclassical, Colonial Revival, Tudor Revival and Bungalow styles of architecture among others.

The famous Grove Park Inn sits on the hillside overlooking the central thoroughfare of Kimberly Avenue.  Several restaurants and bars provide meeting spots for locals along Charlotte Street.

Biltmore Forest

Biltmore ForestBiltmore Forest, once a part of the Biltmore Estate, is not only a neighborhood, but actually a town of almost three square miles as well.  It is located between the Biltmore Estate and the Blue Ridge Parkway and is characterized by its enormous hardwood trees.

The first homes were built around 1923 on White Oak Road.  While there are newer sections of the neighborhood, the areas closest to Biltmore Village and Hendersonville Road feature large historic homes on generous lots.

Biltmore Village

Biltmore VillageHistoric Biltmore Village was initially created as a community for the workers of the Biltmore Estate during its late 19th century construction. The architectural style is very unique with its pebbledash post and beam walls, high pitched roofs and heavy stone foundations inspired by Biltmore Estate architect Richard Sharp Smith.

Though the village is largely filled with businesses at this point, there are a few residences in the community that can enjoy the convenience of a completely walkable neighborhood.

Historic West Asheville

West Asheville HistoricHistoric West Asheville has a style entirely its own.  Many of the homes in this district were built in the 1920s in a bungalow style with large front porches and low-hanging eaves.  In recent decades, the area has undergone a kind of renaissance with people renovating many of these historic homes and revitalizing the central business corridor on Haywood Road, a lively downtown of its own.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Explore the Montford Holiday Tour of Homes in Asheville

Montford Neighborhood Holiday Tour

Have you ever driven through Montford neighborhood near downtown Asheville and wondered about the interiors of the stunning and unique homes in this central historic district?  For a glimpse of holiday ambiance reminiscent of turn of the century Asheville, attend the 21st Annual Montford Holiday Tour of Homes.  

On Saturday, December 10th from 1:00-5:00pm, residents of some of Montford Historic District’s most gorgeous homes will be opening their doors and welcoming visitors.

Montford: Historic Architecture

Montford Holiday Tour of HomesThe self-guided tour features eclectic architecture in both lovingly restored and newly constructed homes that honor the historic styles of the turn of the 20th century. Many of the featured homes are located within the National Register Historic District.  Architectural styles in this district include Victorian, Arts and Crafts, Queen Anne, Neoclassical, Colonial Revival and castle-style homes.

This unique Asheville neighborhood is a reflection of a period of tremendous growth and wealth in Asheville.  The homes are colorful and grand in their individuality.  With wide, tree-lined streets, sidewalks, parks, a recreation center, quaint cafes and restaurants and an historic cemetery, you can make a day of the excursion by exploring the neighborhood's many highlights before the tour.

A Fundraiser for Montford Neighborhood

Montford Holiday Tour of HomesThanks to the volunteer time and hospitality of the residents, festive treats and entertainment will be provided.  Tickets are $25 each and include admission, a tour map and information about each of the featured properties.

Proceeds from the fundraiser benefit the Montford Neighborhood Association for neighborhood improvement projects as well as programs for youth at the Montford Recreation Center.

Tickets may be purchased at MontfordTour.com or at the Asheville Visitors Center gift shop.

Mosaic Realty is proud to be sponsoring this event!  For more information on neighborhoods or real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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River Arts District Neighborhood of Asheville = RAD

River Arts District Asheville

Undeniably, the neighborhood in Asheville that is undergoing the most radical change at the moment is the River Arts District.

This district is situated just southwest of downtown Asheville, nestled between the bustling central business district, historic Biltmore Village and funky West Asheville.  The French Broad River defines the neighborhood’s western border and brings with it many eager river adventurers.  However, it has not always been quite the cultural hub that it is now.

History of the River Arts District in Asheville

Historic River Arts District AshevilleBy the late 1800s, Asheville’s industrial district had settled in the low-lying area surrounding the French Broad River.  During this time, the railroad, still active today as the Norfolk Southern, brought scores of people to town.

In the 1980s, as downtown Asheville began to see a slow renaissance and artists faced higher rents there, many of them set up shop in the industrial buildings lining the banks of the French Broad River.  1994 marked the first official studio stroll, and hence the name River Arts District began to take effect.  

Around the turn of the century, a few Asheville entrepreneurs began to recognize the opportunity in the area and set up businesses such as the Grey Eagle Music Hall and the Wedge Brewery, which are still thriving today.  The momentum has continued through the last 15 years with many businesses experiencing success in the area.

Today, there are plans for a Visitor’s Center with public parking and restrooms and many other improvements in the works.  The city was awarded a federal grant titled Tiger VI to improve transportation in and around the River District.  Ahead of the improved infrastructure, many local businesses are looking to be a part of this area.

River Arts District Culture

River Arts StudiosThis neighborhood is one of the most walkable neighborhoods in Asheville. (Link)  It’s friendliness to alternative transportation is only increasing as the city is investing more and more in infrastructure for greenways, sidewalks and bike lanes.  

The plethora of craft beers, artisan cocktails, fine dining and casual bites to eat is overwhelming and on the rise.  Our detailed blog post on river culture in Asheville lays out some of our favorite destinations in the River Arts District as well as some outstanding pass times.

Architectural Styles of the River Arts District

 Historic cottages dot the hillside of Chicken Hill, facing west over the river and south over the center of the business district.  In the past few years, some historic industrial buildings have been renovated to include studio apartments near artists’ studio spaces.  

New construction is popping up all along the River Arts District featuring mostly condos and modern style homes.  These homes are designed to reduce urban sprawl and to take advantage of the walkability of this neighborhood.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Sources/Further Reading: The History of the River Arts District

 

 

Halloween Haunted Happenings in Asheville: Neighborhoods to Explore

Luminaries Asheville Halloween

Asheville is a town that can slip into a festive spirit as easily as a witch slips onto her broom.  The end of October brings with it much anticipation of haunted Halloween happenings around town.  

Here are several neighborhoods, broken down by region but by no means an exhaustive list, of some of the tried and true neighborhoods that welcome trick-or-treaters and Halloween festivities.

West Asheville

Halloween Dog AshevilleWest Asheville goes all out for Halloween with storefronts fully bedazzled and occasionally even a band set up at the Brew Pump on Haywood Road on Halloween night.

Vermont Avenue, the main corridor through historic West Asheville, welcomes hundreds of families for trick-or-treating.  Some homes put on shadow performances and blast spooky music.  In  recent years, the road has been closed to through traffic, making room for shoulder to shoulder treat-seekers.  Parking can be a challenge, but there is a large lot at the West Asheville Park at the bottom of Vermont Avenue.

For a quieter and more traditional Halloween experience, head to west West Asheville in the Malvern Hills neighborhood.  Sidewalks and wide roads make for a good pedestrian experience for children.  The mix of many generations means that there are plenty of homes offering candy and ample younger ones disguised and seeking candy.

East Asheville

Beverly Hills neighborhood is the go-to spot in East Asheville.  This neighborhood has tons of children, so the atmosphere is super kid-friendly.  The Halloween hub is on Kingsgate Road in the center of the neighborhood.

South Asheville

South Asheville has a handful of larger neighborhoods located close to school districts which makes for a great family vibe where you can cover lots of distance without getting in a car.  Oak Park and Biltmore Park near the T.C. Roberson School district are two stalwart Halloween locations in the south end of town.

North Asheville

Asheville Halloween CatNorth Asheville’s classic neighborhoods are welcoming to little haunts.  Kimberly Avenue, with its wide, tree-lined roads, is a fantastic location for trick or treating.  Adults can simultaneously enjoy the beauty of the architecture and the Grove Park neighborhood.  The historic Rose Garden at Gracelyn and South Griffing often turns into quite a crowd of costume-clad children. 

Homes near Weaver Park and Beaver Lake also have a great Halloween scene.  A bit further to the north, the small town of Weaverville has an historic district downtown that offers convenient, walkable fun for families adventuring out on the 31st.

Central

In the Montford Historic District near downtown Asheville, Montford Avenue is the hot spot for haunted romping.  Houses are decked out from Nine Mile to the Montford Park.  The hosts of the historic Bed and Breakfasts along the avenue greet guests in full regalia with full sized candy bars.Park on side streets or walk from downtown Asheville to check out the decorations along this beautiful road.

Haunted AshevilleKenilworth neighborhood, just a few miles south of downtown Asheville, has long been a favorite Halloween destination for locals.  The homeowners go out of their way with elaborate decorations and jack-o-lantern displays. Most people start at the big church on the corner of Kenilworth Road and Chiles, and then walk up and down the sidewalks of Kenilworth Road, venturing into the smaller side streets..... if they dare.

Wherever you may roam this Halloween, we wish you a safe and fun evening!

For more information on Asheville’s neighborhoods or information on buying or selling real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Neighborhood Spotlight on Beautiful Black Mountain

Black Mountain sunset

Black Mountain, a town of about 8,000 residents, lies just to the east of Asheville.  It is nestled at the southern end of the Black Mountain Range, a part of the Southern Appalachians.  It is the first small town that you encounter coming West from the foothills of the Piedmont region of North Carolina.

There are so many reasons that Black Mountain is a special place to both visit and reside.  Despite its close proximity to Asheville (it is actually part of the Asheville metropolitan statistical area), it has a flavor entirely its own.  Locals cite its small town feel as a major draw.  With little traffic and lots of charm and friendly faces, it is easy to understand.  Here are some of the reasons that we find this neighborhood so appealing.

Natural Beauty in Black Mountain

MontreatThe town of Montreat lies just to the north of Black Mountain.  At the base of the mountains near the back of Montreat community are many trailheads that you may take for stunning mountain views such as the one at Lookout Mountain.  The Swannanoa River flows from East to West through the Swannanoa Valley and Black Mountain.  

Trails at Warren Wilson College meander along the river, and picnicking along rocky outcroppings is a popular year-round outing. Explore the stunning Point Lookout Greenway Bike Trail by starting in Old Fort and climbing 3.6 miles and 900 feet to Ridgecrest.

Black Mountain Cultural Highlights

Camp Rockmont LEAF FestivalA hub of the community is the Black Mountain Center for the Arts.  Located in the renovated Old City Hall, it hosts exhibits on music, visual and performing arts on a monthly basis.  The area’s dedication to fine art is exhibited by the Ben Long fresco gracing the walls of the Montreat Conference Center.  The Swannanoa Valley Museum in downtown Black Mountain interprets and preserves the cultural, natural and social history of the Swannanoa River Valley.

Each August, thousands of people fill the streets for the annual Sourwood Festival.  This free festival is in its 39th year and features music, dancing, arts and crafts in a family-friendly environment.  Lake Eden Arts Festival (LEAF) is held on the campus of Camp Rockmont and draws a sell-out, arts-loving crowd twice a year.

Black Mountain Public Spaces

Black Mountain’s city park is located just outside of the town center at the lovely Lake Tomahawk.  A half mile loop encircles the lake at the foot of the Seven Sisters Peaks and Greybeard Mountain.  

Montreat Park is a favorite area destination for families.  A wonderful playground sits on the banks of a babbling creek among the laurel thickets where families can all enjoy the lush mountain scenery.

Local Black Mountain Businesses

Pisgah BrewingBlack Mountain is renowned for its crafters and artists.  Check out the gorgeous Seven Sisters Gallery, Song of the Wood Musical Instruments, Black Mountain Ironworks or Black Mountain Quilts. 

Enjoy tea at local teahouse Dobra Tea or coffee at Dripolator Coffeehouse.  A long-standing casual restaurant is Our Father’s Pizza and Pasta or enjoy the country elegance of the Red Rocker Inn. 

For nightlife, you can always join a rowdy crowd at White Horse Black Mountain bar and music venue or journey east a few miles through the Swannanoa Valley to Pisgah Brewing which marries craft beer with nationally touring music in their gorgeous outdoor venue.    

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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6 Ways You can Build Community in Your Neighborhood | Asheville NC

Community Gathering

Of all of the facets that a buyer analyzes when considering a neighborhood, the quality of community relations is often overlooked.  Details such as heated square footage, lot size, updates and layout often predominate searches.  However, the nature of the community has a tremendous impact on many people’s enjoyment of their neighborhood.  Fortunately, community can be fostered!  Here are 6 tips for creating community-with an Asheville spin:

1. Create Common Spaces

With all of the emphasis in Western culture on drawing lines in the sand, if a few neighbors share a little space, it can create a world of difference in neighbor relations.  Creating a community garden with shared work and shared bounty provides continued opportunities for connecting.  Asheville has several stellar examples of community gardens.  Montford Community Garden in Montford Historic District and Falconhurst Community Garden in West Asheville are among these.  

Another trend in Asheville neighborhoods is the emergence of the Little Free Library movement.  There are over 20 registered free libraries within Asheville.  Stewards of neighborhood libraries place a small library somewhere on their property near the street.  It is the community’s responsibility and privilege to both keep the library stocked and enjoy its treasures.

Community GardenIndividuals can create common recreational areas in their yards and invite the community to enjoy it.  For example, put up a basketball goal in your cul de sac or driveway.  If you own a pool, create a flag system where you put up a green flag if you are willing to host open pool hours and a red flag if you want private pool time.

    2. Hold Regular Community Gatherings

Planned community gatherings, where there is an attempt made to include every neighbor, is a fantastic way to meet all of the individuals living near you.  Even if no one is willing to host a large group of people, park spaces and community centers make great gathering places.  Some churches and businesses are even willing to allow the use of their parking lot.  Several neighborhoods in Asheville have been known to host block parties by officially closing off their street for a few hours.

Some ideas for community gatherings are yearly yard sales like the ones held in Biltmore Park and Malvern Hills or community potlucks.  On Halloween, the neighborhood surrounding Vermont Avenue in Historic West Asheville goes to great lengths to decorate their homes and hand out tons of candy.  People come from far away to attend this community-hosted gathering.

     3.  Organize a Community Fundraiser

There is no greater way to really get to know your neighbors than to put your heads together and raise money for a cause.  The Montford neighborhood hosts an annual music and art festival where all proceeds go to fund community projects and activities of the Montford Neighborhood Association.  Malvern Hills neighborhood hosts an annual food drive, bringing hundreds of pounds of non-perishable items to MANNA food bank yearly.  

     4.  Volunteer together as a neighborhood

Stream Clean UpWith as many nonprofits as there are in Asheville, there are so many ways to rally your neighbors together in a group volunteer effort.  One of our favorite nonprofits, Asheville GreenWorks, is happy to outfit your group with all that you need to do a litter pick-up in your neighborhood.  River-Link is your go-to resource for adopting a stream in your neighborhood.

      5.  Create a Community-Friendly Front Yard

Instead of installing tall fences in your front yard, consider installing benches and half-walls good for sitting on.  Plant blueberry bushes and raspberry bushes near the front of the yard and encourage neighbors to help themselves.  Plant beautiful perennial borders both on the inside of your fence and on the outside for your neighbors to enjoy.  

      6.  Go Out on a Walk to Know Your Community

The easiest thing that you can do in your neighborhood to create community is to simply get out and stroll.  Stopping and talking with neighbors, delivering a newspaper to an elderly person’s door, and frequenting lemonade stands of neighborhood kids will let you make those invaluable connections.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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