Historic Homes

4 Benefits of Buying a Historic Home in Asheville

Historic Home Kenilworth Asheville

Part of the wide appeal of Asheville is its aesthetic.  Though it is a small city, nestled among the ancient Blue Ridge Mountains, it draws in flocks of tourists.  Many of these tourists eventually make their way into the charming historic neighborhoods of Asheville and are drawn in by the architectural beauty of these well-preserved homes. This is evidenced by the quickly growing population and popularity of Asheville.

The Craftsmanship and Strength of Historic Homes is Unmatched

Unique Coffered Ceiling DesignOlder homes, particularly those that were built before World War 1, are typically built of much higher quality materials than newer homes.  You will often find rare hardwoods such as heart pine and wood from old-growth forests.  Rare gems such as copper adornments and opalescent glass exemplify the handmade nature of these buildings.

America is currently undergoing a type of downtown revival.  Residents and tourists alike are enjoying the cultural hub provided by historic centers.  Start-up businesses such as bookstores and restaurants are thriving in these historic locations.  Historic neighborhoods close to these city centers are increasingly appealing for their vibrancy and walkability.

Possible Tax Incentives

As of January of 2016, the North Carolina legislature has put into effect a historic rehabilitation tax credit program.  This program provides a great incentive to taxpayers who rehabilitate their homes or income-producing properties.  These incentives for improving historic structures are an important tool for historic preservation in North Carolina.  Additionally, a federal tax credit for the rehabilitation of historic homes consists of a 20% credit for qualifying income-producing historic properties that have been rehabilitated.

Adaptive Reuse is Environmentally Friendly

Far superior to demolition, the concept of adaptive reuse encourages people to preserve the structural assets in place.  This saves a lot of energy that goes into the manufacture, transportation and assembly of new building materials.  Historical buildings’ energy efficiency can always be improved upon, and the latest building technologies are making that increasingly easy.

You Are Preserving History

Ideal Yard for Pets and PlayAsheville is a place of deep-rooted history.  A small group of big-dreaming activists played a large role in helping to stop the demolition of many of downtown Asheville’s historic buildings to put in a strip mall.  Fortunately, they were able to stop the destruction, and preservationists stepped in with a Public Works program that encouraged business owners to preserve the historic buildings and create businesses within their walls.  Today, Asheville has a vibrant downtown and many of the businesses are housed in architecturally astounding structures.

Similarly, many devoted homeowners have moved into the many historic neighborhoods around Asheville, and with a little TLC, have preserved these stately homes.  Examples of this can bee seen in the Victorian and Queen Anne homes in Montford, pebble dash cottages in Biltmore Village, charming bungalows in West Asheville and Colonial Revival and Tudor homes of Grove Park, among many others.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Sources and Further Reading: National Trust for Historic Preservation 

Preservation North Carolina