Outdoor Activities

Native American Knowledge and Western Science Intertwine in N.C. Arboretum's Roots of Wisdom Exhibit

NC Arboretum Asheville

Studying the Earth’s past in order to improve its future may be a tried-and-true strategy, but The North Carolina Arboretum brings fresh perspective to the process in its exhibit Roots of Wisdom: Native Knowledge. Shared Science., on display through May 6, 2018. The national traveling exhibit, proudly sponsored by Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty, educates visitors about the ways in which traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples and cutting-edge Western science are intertwined to enhance the natural world.

Roots of Wisdom Exhibit NC ArboretumOn display from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily inside the Arboretum’s Baker Exhibit Center, Roots of Wisdom spotlights four indigenous communities, including the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. The exhibit features the voices of elders and youth, engaging video interactives, and hands-on games, whereby visitors can learn about and take part in the growing movement toward sustainability and the incorporation of age-old yet timeless practices into today’s world to restore vital ecosystems, provide sustainable food sources and improve human health.

Each of the indigenous communities featured in the exhibit holds a sacred relationship with its homeland, and it’s the traditional knowledge gleaned from this relationship that helps to complement Western science in its quest for solutions to a multitude of ecological and health challenges. Visitors to the exhibit will come away with a new perspective on some not-so-new methods for drawing from the Earth’s resources for the greater good.

Roots of Wisdom NC ArboretumThe North Carolina Arboretum, located just south of Asheville on 434 acres of public gardens, has an ongoing history of and keen interest in working with native indigenous communities. Most recently, its Germplasm Repository has joined forces with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, United South and Eastern Tribes, and the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs to assist in conserving traditional ecological knowledge through a variety of initiatives. It is this inspiring collaboration to help preserve the Asheville region’s botanical diversity that continues to shine through in exhibits like Roots of Wisdom.

The central mission of the Arboretum, an affiliate institution of the 17-campus University of North Carolina system, is to cultivate connections between people and plants. A standard $14 per vehicle parking fee is required for non-members; no other admission fee is required for entry to the exhibit. For more information on the Arboretum and Roots of Wisdom, visit www.ncarboretum.org or call (828) 665-2492.

For more information about our area or about real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Asheville on Bikes Gears Up for Cycle-Centric Events

Cycling Asheville

Cyclists in Asheville have plenty to enjoy around the city. From Asheville’s bike path infrastructure to its greenways, opportunities to cycle around town are growing. Spearheading the pro-pedal movement is Asheville on Bikes, a non-profit that advocates for better biking and walking infrastructure in the city and the surrounding Western N.C. region. The group celebrates bike culture regularly through group rides, educational programs – and fun special events.

Ready to get the good times rolling? Then join Asheville on Bikes for two of its most popular events, coming in February and March.

Bike Love

Road Bikes AshevilleThe 11th annual Bike Love, presented by New Belgium Brewing, returns to Salvage Station (468 Riverside Dr.) the evening of Saturday, Feb. 24. Bike Love is Asheville on Bikes’ annual signature extravaganza and fundraiser celebrating all things bicycle. Come and score popular gear and dance the night away while supporting Asheville on Bike’s mission. The event features a silent auction, a bicycle raffle, a photo booth, and music from top local artists. An early reception for special ticket holders includes small bites, a free beer and a sneak peak at the auction goodies. DJ Marley Carroll and Siamese Sound Club featuring CaroMia Tiller will be on hand to supply the grooves throughout the night. You can purchase tickets in advance online or at a variety of shops around Asheville. For more information, visit https://ashevilleonbikes.com/events/asheville-bike-love.

Bike of the Irish, in Asheville

The 12th annual Bike of the Irish is set for March 2018. Bike of the Irish is Asheville on Bike’s annual spring ride, featuring hundreds of green-bedecked riders and routes that showcase the best of Asheville’s bike infrastructure and greenways. Family-friendly and free to everyone (although donations are appreciated), Bike of the Irish has drawn hundreds every year to cycle along scenic routes including the River Arts District, into Downtown Asheville, and along various greenways before ending in an after-ride celebration at brewery favorites. For more information, visit https://ashevilleonbikes.com/events/asheville-bike-of-the-irish.

Thanks to Asheville on Bikes events like these, as well as the efforts of its members, sponsors and civic partners, Asheville is seeing real change on the ground and in the community in creating a safer cycling-friendly city.

For a personally guided tour of bikeable homes or homes near greenways in Asheville, or for more information on other Asheville real estate, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Asheville Trails That Aren't a Hike to Get To

Hikes Near Asheville NC

Western North Carolina is renowned for world-class hikes to suit all tastes and experience levels. Living in Asheville affords easy day trips to every manner of mountain trail. But what if you just want a quick lunchtime loop or an easy afternoon jaunt without going far? Asheville and the immediate area around it are replete with spontaneous options sure to stimulate the senses and pump the blood. Below, a few favorites.

NC Arboretum Explorer Loop

For a nearby hike you can do in just a few hours, head to the North Carolina Arboretum in southwest Asheville, near the banks of the French Broad River. The 4.4-mile loop offers beautifully maintained and gently grade trails that are perfect for young hikers and those looking for a less arduous route. The trail traces the perimeter of the Arboretum, beginning at Hardtimes Road and culminating at the beautiful gardens and sculptures surrounding the Visitor Education Center.

Destination Center Track Trail

The Blue Ridge Parkway visitor center at milepost 384 near Asheville offers an easy, 1.4-mile loop trail that starts at the far end of the visitor center parking lot. The trail allows visitors to enjoy the Parkway’s nature without venturing too far from the road, and also connects to the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. Stop into the center before the hike to get a map, talk to a ranger, pick up some merchandise, learn about other area offerings, watch the park film, and explore Parkway-themed exhibits.

Bent Creek North Loop

Bent Creek Experimental Forest AshevilleThis southwest Asheville trail nestled in Bent Creek Experimental Forest offers views of Enka, Candler and Biltmore Lake along its 8-mile loop. The hike starts at Rice Pinnacle Trailhead and runs along Deer Lake Lodge Trail, up the slopes of Little Hickory Top. The payoff of the moderately difficult climb along the trail is reaching Ingles Field Gap and tracing Stradley Ridge to take in long-range views of west Asheville and Enka.

Haw Creek Valley Overlook

From the Folk Art Center just east of Asheville to the Haw Creek Overlook runs a 5-mile, out-and-back trail featuring a moderate course overflowing with wildflowers and wild mushrooms in season. The gradually uphill hike follows the Mountains-to-Sea Trail along the Blue Ridge Parkway north from the Folk Art Center at milepost 382 to the mountain just above Haw Creek Valley Overlook, which offers picturesque mountain and valley views. When you’re done hiking, you can stop into the center to view a variety of Appalachian arts and crafts and, in season, enjoy daily craft demonstrations and talk to the craftspeople as they work.

For a personally guided tour of neighborhoods near local hiking trails, or for more information on real estate anywhere in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.


Solar Eclipse Promises Out-of-This-World Experience in Asheville

Solar Eclipse Viewing Near Asheville

On Monday, Aug. 21, for the first time in 26 years, parts of the U.S. will experience one of nature’s most amazing celestial events: a total eclipse of the sun. If you’re lucky enough to be in the Asheville area that day, you’re in for a treat: the city will see a 99% eclipse, while Jackson, Swain and Graham counties – all located about 50 to 70 miles west of Asheville – will experience the extremely rare total eclipse. Towns in the direct path include Sylva, Dillsboro, Cashiers, Bryson City, Cherokee and Robbinsville.

Prepare to be Wowed

In a solar eclipse, the moon passes directly between the sun and the Earth, revealing the sun’s rarely seen corona. The moon casts a shadow that moves across the Earth's surface, creating a path of totality. For areas within this narrow, 70-mile-wide band, the experience will be otherworldly: temperatures will drop, birds will go silent, and stars will come out as complete darkness falls in the middle of the day for up to 2 minutes and 40 seconds. The total transition in Western N.C. will begin about 1 p.m. and end around 4 p.m. Asheville will experience a 99% eclipse at approximately 2:37 p.m.

Best Spots to Watch the Eclipse near Asheville

View the Solar Eclipse Near AshevilleThere are many places to witness the entire eclipse in Western N.C. With visitors coming from everywhere to experience the phenomenon, you’ll need to arrive early to avoid heavy traffic. Although many events will have viewing glasses on hand, secure yours in advance and you’ll be assured a safe eclipse experience. Following, some prime spots for soaking in the exciting event:

Downtown Asheville: The Asheville Museum of Science and UNC-Asheville will host a free Solar Eclipse Festival in Pack Square Park from 12-3 p.m., with music, food and hands-on eclipse activities. For those living outside the city who don’t want to travel far, Buncombe County Schools will be hosting three satellite viewing locations: Owen High School, North Buncombe High School and T.C. Roberson High School.

Sylva: Beginning Friday evening, and leading up to the main event on Monday, visitors to downtown Sylva can enjoy festivities to celebrate the eclipse. On Monday, live music, food trucks and eclipse experts will be at Bridge Park (76 Railroad Avenue) in downtown Sylva from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Time of total darkness will be 1 minute, 45 seconds.

Dillsboro: Park at Monteith Park for $2 and take a free shuttle from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. into Dillsboro to experience vendors, galleries, studios, shops and restaurants along the river. Time of total darkness will be 1 minute, 50 seconds.

Cashiers: From 12-4 p.m., the Village Green will host food trucks, live music and experts with equipment for viewing. Everyone receives viewing glasses. Totality of darkness will be 2 minutes, 25 seconds.

EclipseCherohala Skyway: This National Scenic Byway near Robbinsville, with many overlooks at which to park, will experience the longest period of darkness (about 2 minutes, 30 seconds).

Blue Ridge Parkway: The southern section of the parkway will be in the path of total darkness (about 20-60 seconds around 2:36 p.m.) - from around Looking Glass Rock overlook (Milepost 417) to the end at Cherokee. The numerous overlooks on the stretch will fill up quickly, so get there early.

Bryson City: Events downtown on Frye Street and at Swain County Event Park will feature food trucks and music from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Total darkness will be 1 minute, 57 seconds.

Gorges State Park: Visitors can enjoy a three-day celebration with free activities. Aug. 19 is Nature Day, with a series of guided hikes from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 20 is Fun Day, with programs, exhibits, food and music from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. On Eclipse Day, gates will open at 5 a.m. with free solar glasses, food and music from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. – but get there early, since they’ll close the gates when they reach full capacity (1,400 vehicles).

For more information about our area or about real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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From Raging to Restful: River Adventures Near Asheville

River Adventures Near Asheville

Looking for a summer river adventure to keep the body cool and the blood pumping? Asheville’s awash in them! Thanks to the city’s proximity to the region’s major rivers, there are plenty of ways to get your water sport on.

Tubing Near Asheville

River Tubing Near AshevilleDeep Creek in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, near Bryson City, is a popular spot for river tubing. The upper section beginning near Indian Creek Falls has bigger rapids. The lower section is more shallow and easy-going, perfect for all ages. Deep Creek Tube Center & Campground and Deep Creek Lodge & Creekside Tubing are located creekside and are ready with a large supply of tubes and shuttle service.

You can’t get closer or more convenient to Asheville than the French Broad River, where tubers can float right through the middle of town. Tubing the slow-moving waterway can take three hours, and is dependent on water levels of the river, so check for current conditions. For a quieter spot on the river, head south of Asheville, for a relaxed 4-mile float.  French Broad Outfitters and Lazy Otter Outfitters can get you set up in no time!

For gentle rapids, contact Wilderness Cove Tubing to ride the Green River through the lush forest of the Green River Gorge near Saluda. The river is dam-released, so tubing times coincide with the best water level.

Whitewater Rafting and Kayaking in WNC

Whitewater Rafting Near AshevilleThe Asheville area is overflowing with water-sport accolades, thanks to amazing rivers and outfitters galore to provide equipment and guides. From whitewater rafting to inflatable and regular kayak and canoe riding, there’s something for every experience level.

The busiest and most well-known whitewater rafting river is the Nantahala, a dam-controlled river with 20 class II/III rapids and scenic sections of flat water. The 8-mile river ride takes about 2.5 hours. About an hour and a half from Asheville, it's the coldest water, perfect for the hottest days. Wildwater Ltd. Whitewater Rafting and Nantahala Outdoor Center are the most prominent outfitters in the gorge.

The French Broad River offers rapids along with mountain vistas about 45 minutes north of Asheville. Blue Heron Whitewater and French Broad Rafting allow riders to experience a dozen class II and III rapids.

About 50 miles from Asheville near the Tennessee line is the Pigeon River, a dam-controlled river with easy access via I-40. The upper Pigeon River is filled with continuous waves and class III and IV rapids through a scenic gorge. The lower is a more gentle ride. Wildwater Ltd. Whitewater Rafting can equip you to explore the Pigeon River.  

The Green River offers the perfect artery for rafting, through a gorge filled with steep ravines and lush coves. Green River Adventures is your go-to outfitter in this gorge.

Stand-up Paddle Boarding: An Asheville Attraction

Paddling the French Broad RiverPicking up more and more fans along the French Broad is stand-up paddle boarding. Wai Mauna Asheville SUP Tours, Asheville's only outfitter offering guided (and self-guided) stand-up paddle board tours on the French Broad River, supplies stand-up paddle boards with certified instructors and all the gear needed to paddle through the Biltmore Estate and Asheville, ending within walking distance of breweries and shops in the River Arts District.

For more information about our area or about real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Ventana: The Peak of Comfort and Convenience in Asheville

Ventana Asheville blue skies

Daily life can get quite hectic, even in easy-going Asheville. But you can rise above it all – quite literally – in the neighborhood of Ventana. Nestled in the Blue Ridge at an elevation of 3,000 feet, the North Asheville neighborhood offers a private, gated community of uniquely luxurious homes situated seamlessly in a stunningly scenic setting. And one of the best parts? Easy access to town. What may feel like a remote, peaceful spot worlds away from the commercial hubs of Asheville is actually a mere three minutes from the Merrimon Avenue shopping corridor, and eight minutes from downtown Asheville.

An Asheville Rarity: Mountain Views, Close to Town

Ventana Rear Elevation Samsel PlanVery few neighborhoods positioned so close to downtown Asheville can boast the beautiful mountain views Ventana offers. Add to that the natural beauty of majestic forests and winding streams residents can take in from the comfort of their homes, and you’ve got a truly unique enclave. But even as the neighborhood has grown, it has maintained one overarching philosophy: minimizing the impact of building on the surrounding landscape. From the moment construction begins, architectural and site design aim to create continuity and quality throughout the neighborhood, while preserving the natural beauty of the existing landscape and community. Green building and sustainability are highlighted throughout the area.

Ventana Entrance GateThe forests surrounding Ventana are a standout feature, specifically because the homes’ material use and color palettes blend seamlessly and unobtrusively. Ventana’s architectural and site design philosophy aims to educate owners, builders and architects on ways to protect the natural beauty and resources through the building process and beyond. Low association dues (to cover the maintenance of the common areas, gate and private paved roads, trail system, and gas street lamps) ensure that this design philosophy is consistently maintained, for the benefit of residents and environment alike.

Despite being low density, the neighborhood has a high level of infrastructure, including city water, city sewer, natural gas, electric and phone all installed underground. Prospective residents select from vacant lots and pre-construction packages (land plus home) from a group of three competing builders, but they can choose to use their own builder provided they follow Ventana’s architectural guidelines.

Amenities, Mere Minutes Away

Living in Ventana means you’re just a few minutes from the commercial corridor of Merrimon Avenue, replete with grocery stores (Ingles, GreenLife, Trader Joe’s, Fresh Market and Harris Teeter) and restaurants (Vinnie’s Neighborhood Italian, Luella’s Bar-B-Que, Plant, HomeGrown, Asheville Pizza and Brewing Co. and Marco’s Pizzeria, to name just a few). And just a few minutes beyond that lies downtown Asheville, where you can enjoy all the entertainment, fine dining and shopping the urban hub has to offer.

For the outdoor enthusiast, having a home in Ventana puts you at the foot of heaven: think winding, stream-lined walking paths throughout the community, a number of nearby hiking trails, and easy access to the French Broad River and all the water sports it has to offer.

For a personally guided tour of Ventana, contact Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty’s William Yeager, the exclusive listing agent for Ventana’s developer, at William@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him at 828-450-0140. You can also contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him at (828) 337-8190.

It's Spring! Time to Hit Asheville's Array of Farmers' Markets

Asheville Farmer's Market

Asheville area residents count themselves lucky to call this region home for many reasons, not least of which is its easy access to high-quality local produce and regionally crafted artisanal creations. The farms surrounding Asheville and extending throughout Western North Carolina provide an eclectic offering of both seasonal and year-round farmers’ markets as well as working farm tours. Spring heralds the start of the season, so grab your shopping bags and hit these memorable markets and farms!

West Asheville Tailgate Market·      Asheville City Market (North Market St. between Woodfin St. and Walnut St.; Saturday mornings, now through Dec. 16) – Vendors feature farm-fresh produce, local eggs, meats, farm-raised trout, wild salmon, fresh baked goods, handmade pasta, gourmet cheeses, honey, preserves, salsas, flowers, natural body care products, and artisan crafts. Enjoy live music, cooking demonstrations and food tastings from local chefs. For midweek shopping needs, visit Asheville City Market – South in the center of Biltmore Park Town Square. 

·      East Asheville Tailgate Market (954 Tunnel Road; Fridays 3-6 p.m. now through September) – Everything from fiber arts to herbs to hand-crafted popsicles are available against a backdrop of local music and camaraderie. 

·      North Asheville Tailgate Market (330 University Heights on UNCA’s campus; Saturday mornings now through Nov. 18) – Enjoy a full range of more than 40 vendors of local, sustainably produced meats, eggs, produce, cheeses, breads, plants, prepared foods and crafts. 

Asheville Farmer's Market·      Oakley Farmers Market (Meadow at Highland Brewing Co., 12 Old Charlotte Hwy.; Thursdays 3:30-6:30 p.m. now through Sept. 28.) – This market’s mission is to provide fresh, locally produced foods to its neighbors, “regardless of differences in income, race or social status.” 

·      River Arts District Farmers Market (175 Clingman Ave.; Wednesdays 2-6 p.m.) – Flying Cloud Farm, Spinning Spider Creamery and Asheville Wild Foods are just a few of the vendors you can find here. 

·      West Asheville Tailgate Market (718 Haywood Road; Tuesdays 3:30-6:30 p.m.) – Farmers’ market staples can be found alongside diverse offerings like plant starts for gardens, natural soaps and herbal products, and locally made art and crafts.

·      Western North Carolina Farmers Market (570 Brevard Road; daily 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., April-October; 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., November-March) – This year-round indoor market features fruits and vegetables, mountain crafts, jams, jellies, preserves, sourwood honey, fresh baked breads, cookies and dozens of other farm-fresh items.

Asheville Area Farms

Asheville Area FarmsIf you’d like to go straight to the source, many working farms in the area are open to the public and offer an array of on-site activities and products for sale. Here’s a small sample of area farms to visit:

·      Hickory Nut Gap Farm in Fairview offers Farm Dinners, HNG Kitchen Classes and Friday Night Barn Dances, just to name a few activities.

·      Franny’s Farm in Leicester hosts everything from summer camps to weddings to the annual Barnaroo Music Festival.

·      Sky Top Orchard stands out among pick-your-own apple and fruit orchards for its ponds with ducks and geese, a barnyard area with sheep, goats, chickens, turkeys, peacocks and more, a bamboo forest to explore, tractor rides and lots of picnic areas.

·      For a fun way to visit sustainable family farms in Western North Carolina, check out Asheville Farm to Table Tours. The themed tours take participants to several farms in a day, providing a unique window into regional farming.

For more information about our area or about real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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For most homeowners, curb appeal begins with beautiful landscaping. But just as important is the preservation of the natural ecosystem around us. With the use of native plant species in yards and gardens, homeowners can integrate the two goals, to great success.


Shasta DaisyNative species of plants occur naturally, without human introduction or intervention. Over time, they have built up physical and biological characteristics specific to regional elements – things like climate, soil type, moisture, and other local plants, animals and insects. They are hardy, environmentally friendly, and help to restore regional landscapes that may be compromised in rapidly developing areas. In short, they are perfectly adapted to their home.

When landscaping with native plants, the best research is simply looking around to get an idea of what grows near your home naturally and beautifully. In the Asheville area, it’s easy to maximize your success by matching the right plants with the right site conditions. To do this, assess the type of light and amount of moisture your planting site receives throughout the day, as well as throughout each growing season. The direction your garden faces, the amount of horizontal and vertical working space you have, and your altitude also figure prominently in native landscaping success. Having your soil pH tested is helpful, and will indicate whether the soil needs to be amended.


Butterfly bushFrom wispy wildflowers to low-growing groundcovers, native options in the Asheville area are diverse enough to suit any weekend landscaper’s tastes.

A lot of native planting depends on your landscaping goals:

·      Looking to provide a lush wildlife habitat? Start by creating layers: Plant low-growing plants and shrubs under taller ones, and create an environment where birds can nest and feed.

·      For a punch of color that attracts an array of pollinators, nothing beats wildflowers. Popular in the Asheville area and surrounding region, and targeted to specific seasons, are eastern bluestar, butterfly weed and cardinal flower.

·      For a natural way to stem erosion and minimize maintenance, groundcovers are the way to go. Some popular Western N.C. natives include the multi-season showstopper partridgeberry (white flowers in the spring, red berries in the fall); and green and gold, perfect for populating a rock garden.

·      Ferns and tall grasses provide the ideal habitat for a range of songbirds, butterflies and small animals. Shade garden favorites include cinnamon and Christmas ferns. Grasses are a low-maintenance option, with cloud-like switchgrass and year-round little bluestem popular picks.

AzaleaAsheville is replete with local nurseries well-versed in all aspects of native landscaping. In addition, there are local educational resources galore to get you started on your way to an ecosystem-supporting yard. For more information and guidance on regional native landscaping, visit the following:

Asheville Botanical Gardens

N.C. State University’s “Urban Landscaping With Native Plants” 

N.C. Native Plant Society 

Bee City USA 

And if you’re looking for the perfect house to go with that native-populated yard, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.


Your Guide to the Past, Present and Future of Greenways in Asheville

Bikes ParkFor many people, the image of friends, couples, children and retirees gathering together at a city’s parks, and arriving there in multifaceted ways, brings about a feeling of community well-being.  In an increasingly busy and crowded world, we often make choices about our homes based upon access and proximity to public parks and alternative transportation.  

Asheville, North Carolina is no exception to this. The housing market within the city of Asheville is booming, and homes with proximity to greenways are not staying on the market for long.  Check out the history of Asheville’s greenways, the current state, and where the greenways are headed here.

The History of Greenways in Asheville

In the three decades prior to 2015, Asheville claimed only 5 miles of greenway with little connectivity between them.  This allowed for isolated pockets of greenway enjoyment but major obstacles to promoting alternative and green methods of transportation.  Greenways that are long-standing in Asheville include the French Broad River Park Greenway and Reed Creek Greenway near UNCA and the city center.

The Current State of Greenways in Asheville

Asheville ParkThe City of Asheville helps to maintain 4 greenways currently, the largest being the French Broad River Greenway at 2.83 miles in length.  It is mostly an 8 foot wide asphalt path that meanders from the Hominy Creek trailhead, through Carrier Park, along Amboy Road and to the French Broad River Park and dog park.  It provides connectivity for Asheville’s largest and most frequented park system.

Glen’s Creek Greenway connects Weaver Park in North Asheville to UNCA and and the Botanical Gardens; it is nearly a mile in length. Nearby, Reed Creek Greenway (.7 miles long) connects the historic Montford neighborhood to the UNCA area and Glen Creek Greenway. Finally, the Riverbend Park Greenway (nearly .5 miles long) hugs the Swannanoa River in east Asheville.

The Future of Greenways in Asheville

Asheville GreenwayThe master plan for greenways in Asheville has a goal of creating a 15 mile system composed of 12 interconnected corridors.  This River to Ridge Greenway and Trail network would encircle downtown Asheville.  It would reach into the River Arts District, French Broad River Greenways, Southslope Greenway Connector, Beaucatcher Greenway and Urban Trail.  

The use of multi-paths for both transportation and recreation has consistently ranked high on the public’s list of infrastructure projects that it values. Additionally, governments outside of the city of Asheville are beginning to catch the greenway bug.  Both the town of Woodfin and Buncombe County governments are advocating for connectivity with the Asheville greenway system.

A major goal of the project is to connect people to some of the beautiful assets of our area: the mountains and the rivers.

For more information on our area or real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Sources: Asheville Citizen Times article, February 2017

The City of Asheville



The Ultimate Guide to Asheville Area Cycling


Asheville has long been a destination for outdoor adventure.  In recent years it is gaining in popularity as a cycling destination, and the city and local businesses are responding!  From increased access to greenways and bike corrals to a plethora of cycling outfitters offering group rides, to growing advocacy efforts, cycling is on the rise in Asheville.

Mountain Biking in Western North Carolina

One of the many benefits of living in the Western North Carolina mountains is being able to take advantage of the outdoor adventure opportunities all around us. Just 10 minutes southwest of downtown is Bent Creek Experimental Forest, which has miles of gravel roads and single track.

Mountain Biking AshevilleThere are many other world class mountain biking opportunities within a 90 minute drive of Asheville at Tsali Recreational Area, Pisgah National Forest and Dupont State Forest

Get your mountain bike fix right in town at Kolo Bike Park, a mountain bike park with trails designed for progression of skills.  They also host bike camps at their location in West Asheville.  In 2016 they opened a new location for bike rentals near the greenway trails at the Smoky Park Adventure Center.

Bailey Mountain Bike Park, located near Mars Hill north of Asheville, is a gravity-specific bike park with over 1000 feet of vertical elevation for an incredible downhill experience.  This gorgeous piece of land is being developed as a downhill mountain biking destination.  Additionally, lots are available in this development and Mosaic Realty is the exclusive real estate partner of Bailey Mountain.  More information by emailing Justin at Justin@BaileyMountainWNC.com.

Road Biking in Asheville/ Buncombe County

Blue Ridge ParkwayThe Blue Ridge Parkway is a nationally renowned scenic highway that cyclists voyage to for the beautiful mountain vistas from the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains. 
Buncombe County roads in Swannanoa, Leicester, Hominy Valley and Mars Hill offer fantastic opportunities for road biking and gorgeous rural mountain scenery.  Many group rides from local bicyle shops explore these county roads.

Asheville Area Cycling Organizations

Blue Ridge Bicycle Club seeks to promote fun and healthy lifestyles through cycling in Western North Carolina.  They have a comprehensive cycling event calendar on their website.

Ring of Fire races are a 12 race training series on the safe and fast track at Carrier Park every other Wednesday from March until late July.  There are free kids races as well!

Asheville Cyclocross hosts free clinics at Bent Creek Community Park and has a strong presence at the annual Mountain Sports Festival at Carrier Park.  They also host rides at Oskar Blue’s REEB Ranch in Brevard.

Bicycle Stores in Asheville

There is an incredible array of options when it comes to getting outfitted for your cycling needs in this city!  We suggest trying out some of the group rides offered at shops such as Liberty Bikes, Motion Makers, and Beer City Bicycles to get acquainted with some of the fantastic service providers and their cycling wears.  

Cycling Advocacy in Asheville

Cycling AshevilleMosaic Realty is proud to support the 5th annual NC Bike Walk Summit held this year in Asheville.  At this event, cycling advocates and experts will gather to address issues surrounding economic benefits of cycling, funding strategies for bicycling and advancing bicycle advocacy in the area.  The event is September 16 and 17 this year.

Asheville on Bikes is a bicycle advocacy group that works tirelessly to make this a bikeable community.  They have successfully installed bicycle corals in various parts of town among other initiatives.  They also host a variety of fun-filled cycling events throughout the year such as the Bike of the Irish and Summer Cycle.

At Mosaic Realty, we aim to connect you with real estate that fits your lifestyle.  We have specific knowledge of the areas of Asheville that may appeal to your interests.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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