Asheville Community

Wicked Plants: The Exhibit Returns to The N.C. Arboretum

Wicked Plants Exhibit NC Arboretum

Plants: They can be beautiful. They can be beneficial. But did you know they can also be deadly?

After five years of traveling around the U.S., the dangerous world of Wicked Plants: The Exhibit, a one-of-a-kind experience designed and created by The North Carolina Arboretum, returns to Asheville. The fun, safe and educational way to explore some of nature’s most toxic flora will be on display at the Arboretum’s Baker Exhibit Center from Sept. 20-Jan. 7, 2018.

See Plants in a Whole New Light

Wicked Plants Exhibit NC ArboretumThe Wicked Plants exhibit provides a comprehensive overview that teaches about botany, health care and wellness in an entertaining, unique setting. Inspired by author Amy Stewart’s best-selling book “Wicked Plants: The Weed that Killed Lincoln’s Mother and other Botanical Atrocities,” Wicked Plants features interactive displays in a Victorian-era “home,” where visitors can travel from room to room to learn about various poisonous plants that may be lurking in the most unexpected places: their homes and backyards.

The Wicked Plants exhibit – sponsored in part by Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty – touches on a side of vegetation that’s rarely revealed. Visitors can feel like they’re part of a crime scene investigation in the potions laboratory; they can experience sniffing stations in the bathroom; and they can take a walk through a simulated graveyard featuring some of the most common deadly and toxic plants around.

Creepy but Cool

Wicked Plants Exhibit NC ArboretumSince the exhibit first opened at the Arboretum in 2012, it has gained fans beyond the Asheville area, traveling to museums and science centers across the country including the Florida Museum of Natural History and the Springs Preserve Museum in Las Vegas. Designed to feel a bit creepy, Wicked Plants creates an environment particularly engaging to children, making it easy for families to learn about bloodcurdling botany together.

Beyond its standard daytime exhibit hours of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wicked Plants will offer special extended hours during the Arboretum’s fourth annual Winter Lights nightly holiday light show (Nov. 17–Dec. 31) for all Winter Lights ticket holders. For more information on Wicked Plants, please visit www.ncarboretum.org. Exhibit admission to Wicked Plants is free; standard Arboretum parking fees ($14 per standard vehicle for non-members) apply.

In conjunction with the exhibit’s return, the Arboretum will host a special reading and book signing by Amy Stewart on Sept. 21, from 6 to 8 p.m., in the Arboretum’s Education Center. Tickets are $10 for Arboretum members and $12 for non-members and must be purchased in advance at ncarboretum.org. Parking is included in the ticket price.

The North Carolina Arboretum is located off the Blue Ridge Parkway at Milepost 393. From I-26, take Exit 33 and follow Blue Ridge Parkway signs for 2 miles to the entrance ramp.

For more information on living in our area or on Asheville real estate, contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at 828-337-8190.

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Volunteer Opportunities Abound in Asheville

Asheville Volunteer Opportunities

The spirit of helping, sparked during the holidays, can continue throughout the year, thanks to the myriad volunteer options available around Asheville. Below, a few ways to help those less fortunate in our community:

Homeward Bound

The local chapter of Homeward Bound, which aims to end homelessness by providing much-needed services to people transitioning into a home, has many volunteer opportunities. AHOPE Day Center volunteers assist people experiencing homelessness while they wait for housing by handing out towels and toiletries for showers, and checking mail and phone messages, all in an environment of kindness. Volunteers can also help at the Welcome Home Donation Center, which provides basic furniture and household goods to help clients’ new housing feel like home.

Asheville Area Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity AshevilleDedicated to eliminating substandard housing locally and worldwide through constructing, rehabilitating and preserving homes, Habitat for Humanity offers volunteers a variety of ways to help. No prior experience is needed to aid in building or repairing homes. Volunteers can also lend a hand at ReStore, a retail store that sells donated home goods and building supplies at affordable prices to the general public.

The Literacy Council of Buncombe County

The Literacy Council of Buncombe County is a nonprofit organization that teaches basic reading, writing and English language skills to adults and children through individual and small-group instruction. Tutors complete orientation sessions and training, and commit to working with their students for a designated period of time.

Animal Lovers

Asheville Area Pet SheltersThere are plenty of ways to help animals in Buncombe County through organizations like Asheville Humane Society and Brother Wolf. Volunteers do everything from providing socialization and companionship to adoption-center animals to manning the front desk and assisting with daily cleaning.

Asheville City Schools Foundation

Asheville City Schools Foundation, which works to create strong public schools and break the cycle of poverty, has a need for volunteers to tutor and mentor students K-12. Volunteers can also lend their expertise to tutor Asheville High School/SILSA students in all subjects, but especially math.

The Council on Aging of Buncombe County

A nonprofit that provides services to those 60 and older, The Council on Aging of Buncombe County offers a volunteer transportation program that provides rides to seniors who can no longer drive. It also has a need for volunteers to help in its Adopt-A-Lawn service.

RiverLink

RiverLink promotes the environmental and economic vitality of the French Broad River and its watershed as a place to live, learn, work and play. Volunteers can help with river cleanups, invasive plant removal, environmental education, special events, administrative tasks, park construction and more.

MANNA FoodBank

Hunger-relief organization MANNA FoodBank provides food to more than 347 member agencies throughout Western North Carolina. There’s a need for drivers, distribution assistants and warehouse volunteers.

For more information about our area or about real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Asheville Community Centers Offer Outlets for Entertainment, Information and Social Support

Asheville Community Centers

Community centers form the heart of a neighborhood, and Asheville is brimming with a variety of them. From spaces where folks can gather for games, camaraderie and social support, to meeting places equipped to handle a crowd, Asheville offers a range of community centers for young and old.

Asheville Jewish Community Center

The Asheville JCC celebrates Jewish culture and builds community through a wide variety of programs open to all regardless of background, religion, belief or age. An annual membership affords access to childcare, summer camps, most aquatics programs and other activities. 236 Charlotte St. https://www.jcc-asheville.org

West Asheville Community CenterKairos West Community Center

Kairos West, located in West Asheville, is a space for community building and empowerment through art and social service. The space is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and available for groups to use free of charge for community-building events and meetings. Also located in the building is 12 Baskets Café, offering free meals and community building to everyone. 610 Haywood Road. https://kairoswest.wordpress.com

Dr. Wesley Grant Sr. Southside Center

Located in central Asheville and named for a prominent leader in Asheville’s African American community during the time of the Civil Rights movement and the period of Asheville’s urban renewal in the 1960s and 1970s, the Dr. Wesley Grant Sr. Southside Center is home to a variety of creative programs for all ages. The center features classrooms and an auditorium with a stage, and uses a geothermal HVAC system, and sports skylights and a living roof. 285 Livingston Street Park. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Wesley-grant-SR-southside-center/129319413837629

Asheville Community Yoga

Asheville Community Yoga is a nonprofit center for individual and community transformation offering donation-based yoga, Qigong, mindfulness-based programs, meditation, workshops, introductory immersions, teacher trainings, continuing education, yoga in Spanish, and yoga for seniors and kids. All classes, workshops and events at the center are free for people who cannot afford to pay. For people who are able to pay, the suggested “Love Offering” amount is $5 to $15 for regular classes and $15+ for special events and workshops. 8 Brookdale Road. https://ashevillecommunityyoga.com

Community Centers Asheville NCWoodfin Community Center

The Woodfin Community Center, located in quiet Woodfin, contains a full kitchen, a small stage, seating and tables for more than 200 guests as well as restroom facilities. The center is available for rent by the day. 23 Community St. https://www.woodfin-nc.gov

Burton Street Community Center

The Burton Street Community Center features an auditorium, game room, billiard room, arts and crafts room, a computer lab, a weight room and a kitchen. The park surrounding the center features two basketball courts, a playground and a play field. 134 Burton St.

To learn about Real Estate in Asheville, contact Mosaic Realty owner Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him anytime at 828-337-8190.

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