Asheville Hikes

Asheville Trails That Aren't a Hike to Get To

Hikes Near Asheville NC

Western North Carolina is renowned for world-class hikes to suit all tastes and experience levels. Living in Asheville affords easy day trips to every manner of mountain trail. But what if you just want a quick lunchtime loop or an easy afternoon jaunt without going far? Asheville and the immediate area around it are replete with spontaneous options sure to stimulate the senses and pump the blood. Below, a few favorites.

NC Arboretum Explorer Loop

For a nearby hike you can do in just a few hours, head to the North Carolina Arboretum in southwest Asheville, near the banks of the French Broad River. The 4.4-mile loop offers beautifully maintained and gently grade trails that are perfect for young hikers and those looking for a less arduous route. The trail traces the perimeter of the Arboretum, beginning at Hardtimes Road and culminating at the beautiful gardens and sculptures surrounding the Visitor Education Center.

Destination Center Track Trail

The Blue Ridge Parkway visitor center at milepost 384 near Asheville offers an easy, 1.4-mile loop trail that starts at the far end of the visitor center parking lot. The trail allows visitors to enjoy the Parkway’s nature without venturing too far from the road, and also connects to the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. Stop into the center before the hike to get a map, talk to a ranger, pick up some merchandise, learn about other area offerings, watch the park film, and explore Parkway-themed exhibits.

Bent Creek North Loop

Bent Creek Experimental Forest AshevilleThis southwest Asheville trail nestled in Bent Creek Experimental Forest offers views of Enka, Candler and Biltmore Lake along its 8-mile loop. The hike starts at Rice Pinnacle Trailhead and runs along Deer Lake Lodge Trail, up the slopes of Little Hickory Top. The payoff of the moderately difficult climb along the trail is reaching Ingles Field Gap and tracing Stradley Ridge to take in long-range views of west Asheville and Enka.

Haw Creek Valley Overlook

From the Folk Art Center just east of Asheville to the Haw Creek Overlook runs a 5-mile, out-and-back trail featuring a moderate course overflowing with wildflowers and wild mushrooms in season. The gradually uphill hike follows the Mountains-to-Sea Trail along the Blue Ridge Parkway north from the Folk Art Center at milepost 382 to the mountain just above Haw Creek Valley Overlook, which offers picturesque mountain and valley views. When you’re done hiking, you can stop into the center to view a variety of Appalachian arts and crafts and, in season, enjoy daily craft demonstrations and talk to the craftspeople as they work.

For a personally guided tour of neighborhoods near local hiking trails, or for more information on real estate anywhere in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

Native American Knowledge and Western Science Intertwine in N.C. Arboretum's Roots of Wisdom Exhibit

NC Arboretum Asheville

Studying the Earth’s past in order to improve its future may be a tried-and-true strategy, but The North Carolina Arboretum brings fresh perspective to the process in its exhibit Roots of Wisdom: Native Knowledge. Shared Science., on display through May 6, 2018. The national traveling exhibit, proudly sponsored by Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty, educates visitors about the ways in which traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples and cutting-edge Western science are intertwined to enhance the natural world.

Roots of Wisdom Exhibit NC ArboretumOn display from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily inside the Arboretum’s Baker Exhibit Center, Roots of Wisdom spotlights four indigenous communities, including the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. The exhibit features the voices of elders and youth, engaging video interactives, and hands-on games, whereby visitors can learn about and take part in the growing movement toward sustainability and the incorporation of age-old yet timeless practices into today’s world to restore vital ecosystems, provide sustainable food sources and improve human health.

Each of the indigenous communities featured in the exhibit holds a sacred relationship with its homeland, and it’s the traditional knowledge gleaned from this relationship that helps to complement Western science in its quest for solutions to a multitude of ecological and health challenges. Visitors to the exhibit will come away with a new perspective on some not-so-new methods for drawing from the Earth’s resources for the greater good.

Roots of Wisdom NC ArboretumThe North Carolina Arboretum, located just south of Asheville on 434 acres of public gardens, has an ongoing history of and keen interest in working with native indigenous communities. Most recently, its Germplasm Repository has joined forces with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, United South and Eastern Tribes, and the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs to assist in conserving traditional ecological knowledge through a variety of initiatives. It is this inspiring collaboration to help preserve the Asheville region’s botanical diversity that continues to shine through in exhibits like Roots of Wisdom.

The central mission of the Arboretum, an affiliate institution of the 17-campus University of North Carolina system, is to cultivate connections between people and plants. A standard $14 per vehicle parking fee is required for non-members; no other admission fee is required for entry to the exhibit. For more information on the Arboretum and Roots of Wisdom, visit www.ncarboretum.org or call (828) 665-2492.

For more information about our area or about real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

Search: View all homes for sale in Asheville

Proximity Makes Asheville Tops in Blue Ridge Parkway Hikes

Blue Ridge Parkway near Asheville

Much of the beauty of living in Asheville is the city’s amazing accessibility to the Blue Ridge Parkway. With the famed Virginia-to-North Carolina scenic highway – America’s longest linear park at 469 miles – winding along mere minutes from Asheville’s city center, it’s easy to jump on the parkway – whether it’s an impromptu afternoon hike you’re after, or an all-day trek – and still be able to cap the day with dinner downtown. Following, a few favorites to check out:

Mount Mitchell Summit and Balsam Nature Trail

This short hike is 31 miles from Asheville along the parkway. A shady balsam-fir forest shrouds the paths to the top of Mount Mitchell, the tallest peak east of the Mississippi at 6,684 feet.

Black Balsam Hike Near AshevilleMount Pisgah Trail

You can be to this moderately challenging trail from Asheville in 40 minutes. Hike through lush green forest to reach the tower-capped summit, which offers 360-degree long-range views.

Craggy Gardens Trail

In season, blooming rhododendron and blueberries line the trail to the grassy mountaintop of Craggy Gardens, 19 miles from Asheville along the parkway. Even when not in bloom, the trail, framed in ghostly gnarled branches, still draws hikers to its surreal beauty.

Graveyard Fields Trail

One of the parkway’s most popular hikes, Graveyard Fields offers waterfalls, gorgeous views, and wild blueberries and blackberries for picking – all just 34 miles from Asheville.

Black Balsam Knob and Tennent Mountain Loop

A 5-mile loop takes you over two summits, affording amazing views from trails that cut through the grassy balds of Black Balsam Knob and Tennent Mountain.

Blue Ridge Parkway Near AshevilleRattlesnake Lodge

This trail – a mere 21 minutes from Asheville – winds through the remains of an early 1900s estate, with parts of a barn foundation, lodge, spring house, pool and outbuildings still standing for hikers to explore.

Visitor Center Loop

An easy, smooth hike, the Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center loop offers the perfect terrain for youngsters or those not wanting to venture too far into the woods or too far away from the parking area.

And when the parkway is closed…

Craven Gap

This trail, accessible at the end of Town Mountain Road in Craven Gap, is 15 minutes from downtown Asheville, but feels worlds away. It’s proximity to the city, easy hiking, and beautiful backdrop make it a popular spot for locals and visitors alike – including President Obama and wife Michelle, who hiked the trail during a 2010 visit to the area.

Folk Art Center Trail to Bull Mountain

A popular, well-maintained spot located just outside the city limits, the Folk Art Center Trail winds along the Mountains to Sea Trail, a rolling path interspersed with short steep climbs. Begin or end your hike with a stop into the Folk Art Center.

For more information about Asheville or about Real Estate in Asheville, contact Mosaic Realty owner Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him anytime at 828-337-8190.

Search: Real Estate in Asheville