Asheville Neighborhoods

Historic Hideaway in the Hub of Asheville: Kenilworth Neighborhood

 

Kenilworth Neighborhood Tour from Mosaic Realty on Vimeo.

 

Named after Castle Kenilworth in England, Asheville’s own Kenilworth Neighborhood offers tranquil serenity only minutes from the city’s finest shopping, dining and entertainment.  Nestled between Biltmore Village on the south and downtown Asheville to the north, Kenilworth has long been an prestigious residential district in the Asheville area.

 

A Brief History of Kenilworth

 

As holds true of several Asheville neighborhoods, Kenilworth residences emerged around the presence of a large inn.  James Chiles purchased the Patton Farm and subsequently developed The Kenilworth Inn, a large Tudor Revival building  in 1926.  It is now used as an apartment building and is on the National Register of Historic Places.  To provide recreational opportunities for guests, he created the 19 acre Lake Kenilworth.  Nearly one hundred years later, this lake is still providing a peaceful habitat for wildlife and stunning vistas  for residents.


 

Kenilworth Neighborhood Architecture

 

Having had its heyday in the 1920s, Kenilworth exhibits styles of architecture characteristic of this time period.  Quaint bungalows are nestled within the mature wooded landscape, and Spanish Colonial Revival, Tudor, and Prairie gems perch atop the gentle hills.  Increasingly, you will find green infill populating the neighborhood and providing a fantastic opportunity for eco-friendly living.


 

Convenient to Work and Play

 

Kenilworth Neighborhood is located within a few miles of several of the area’s largest employers.  Many medical industry professionals live in Kenilworth due to its proximity to Mission Hospital.  Being located between Biltmore and downtown, it is also an ideal location for tourism industry professionals.

 

In addition to  having its own scenic lake, the neighborhood also has its own park. Kenilworth Park, located in the heart of the neighborhood,  has picnic tables and grills, ballfields and courts, and a playground.  Merely a few minute drive away, you will find yourself in the excitement of downtown Asheville or the quaint serenity of Biltmore Village.

 

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

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Asheville's Beaverdam Neighborhood: Serene Rural Living in the City

 

 

Beaverdam Neighborhood Tour from Mosaic Realty on Vimeo.

Beaverdam neighborhood, several miles north of downtown Asheville, was one of the first areas to be settled in Buncombe County.  Beaverdam Creek, the main artery flowing through this beautiful valley, is not as strong as it once was, having powered a grist mill in the 1800s.  However, passers-by will notice how the community orients towards the babbling creek.  

 

Historical Significance

 

There is some evidence that the Beaverdam Valley and the Swannanoa River Valley were settled before Asheville, with settlers entering the valley through Craven Gap and Bull Creek.  Early family names that you may recognize from other areas of present-day Asheville include the Bairds, Swains, Lanes and Rices.

 

Grace Episcopal Church, situated on Merrimon Avenue near the entrance to Beaverdam Road, was first built as a log cabin in 1860.  It served as a community hub for early settlers of the valley.  In 1905, it was constructed in its present day design by famous architect Richard Sharp Smith.  

 

The Lay of the Land

 

This gorgeous valley, carved out over millions of years by the once-mighty Beaverdam Creek, has gently rolling hills nestled up to the larger ridges of the Blue Ridge Mountains behind them.  The setting is still largely pastoral and bucolic, with many coves and communities of homes.  The winding and climbing Beaverdam Road and Elk Mountain Highway provide the main thoroughfares through the valley.

 

Architectural Style

 

Historical farmhouses and even a few remaining log cabins dot the valley and are well worth seeking out and researching the stories behind them.  For example, the 1840s Killian House, located on the left, west of Wild Cherry Road, still stands today.  Newer styles of homes include mid century ranchers, contemporary and traditional styles and GreenBuilt homes.  

 

Dining and Entertainment

 

Although the neighborhood itself is largely residences and scenic farmland, it is close to all of the amenities you would need.  Downtown Asheville is merely 4 miles south and the small town of Woodfin is a mile or two up Merrimon Avenue.  Beaver Lake and the Bird Sanctuary provide opportunities for level walking.  Boating, fishing and paddle boarding are also permitted on the lake.

 

There are many restaurants within a mile of the entrance to Beaverdam Road,  Avenue M, Zen Sushi, Marco's Pizzeria and The Hop Ice Cream among them.  Catch movies at Asheville Pizza and Brewing Company or sip craft brews at Thirsty Monk in Reynolds Mountain Village.

 

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

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View all homes for sale in Beaverdam Neighborhood

 

Resources:  Beaverdam Valley Community Association

 

Sources and Further Reading: ACT article Jan 2014

 

Dave Carey's History of Beaverdam Valley

 

Video by: JustinAsheville

 

Lakeside Living in Asheville: Lakeview Park


Lake View Park Neighborhood from Mosaic Realty on Vimeo.

 

A Brief History of Lakeview Park

 

In the early 1900s, the area that is now Beaver Lake was a quiet meadow known as Baird Bottom where livestock grazed.  During this time, a trolley system ferried vacationers back and forth between Asheville and Weaverville.

 

In 1923, esteemed urban planner and landscape architect John Nolen designed the neighborhood and recreational lake.  According to local legend, famous Asheville-born author Thomas Wolfe would occasionally go skinny dipping in the lake when darkness fell.

 

Beaver Lake and Park

 

Today, the lake and surrounding park and trail system are privately owned and maintained by residents of Lakeview Park.  On any given day, you will see both residents and guests enjoying the park.  A walking trail was recently extended to the full circumference of the lake.  Residents can store canoes and kayaks at the lake for a fee.

 

Just south of Beaver Lake you will find the Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary.  This is a 3/8th mile long boardwalk that winds through the wetlands of Beaver Lake.  There are benches to stop and observe the various species of native and migratory birds that come to feed and rest near the lake.

Beaver Lake Asheville

 

Beaver Lake, North Asheville

 

The Community

 

Only 4 miles from downtown Asheville, this neighborhood offers the convenience of being close to town with the serenity of lakeside living.  The water and ample green space of this size is rare to find so close to the city center.  Many architectural styles, from historic to contemporary, grace the gentle topography of the neighborhood.

 

Merrimon Avenue, the main road leading into the city from Lakeview Park, has all of the conveniences you would need.  There are 5 or more grocery stores to choose from.  Many favorite local eateries also line this road, including Zen Sushi, Marco’s Pizzeria, and Homegrown restaurant.  You can watch a movie and grab a beer at Asheville Pizza and Brewing then cross Merrimon for some locally made ice cream at The Hop.

 

Living in Asheville

 

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

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Suggested Reading and Sources:

 

Lakeview Park

 

Video:

 

By Just in Asheville

 

Spotlight on South Asheville: Biltmore Park Neighborhood

Dog on Sidewalkphoto credit: http://gratisography.com/

 

Biltmore Park is a neighborhood unlike any other in Asheville.  It was intentionally designed as a walkable 21st century community where you can live, work, shop and play all in the same area.  You can really find much of what you need via foot or bike. However, the community is convenient to interstate, the Asheville airport, and many major grocery stores and shopping retailers.

Biltmore Park Town Square

This vibrant mixed-use development in South Asheville was planned to look like a city-center.  The mostly brick structures house commercial businesses on the street level and residences above.

Some of the locals’ favorite establishments for dining include Neo Burrito and Brixx Pizza for casual dining and P.F. Chang’s for more upscale dining.  Stroll on over to Ya Ya’s Frozen Yogurt after dinner.

You can also do much of your shopping in the town center.  REI has a major store there for equipping all of your outdoor adventures.  The kids will be delighted by the offerings of local toy supplies O.P. Taylor’s.

There are plenty of opportunities for entertainment in the town center.  There is a branch of the YMCA, a movie theatre, and even a brew pub, Thirsty Monk, boasting all of the area’s best microbrews on tap.

Styles of Homes in Biltmore Park

You will find a variety of homes in Biltmore Park.  For the urbanite, you can live in a town home style condo above one of the many businesses in town center.  Just outside of town center, there are mid-size single family homes on modest lots.  As you move farther away from town center, the homes and lots increase in size until you reach the palatial homes tucked away on the wooded mountainside overlooking the neighborhood.

Walkable Neighborhood

This planned community was designed with walkability and green living in mind.  Estes elementary school, Koontz Intermediate school, Valley Springs Middle School and TC Roberson High School are all walkable or bikeable from most of the neighborhood.  This is one of the highest-performing school districts in the area.

Take the well-maintained and shady paved path that winds throughout the area to a neighbor’s house or to the town center.  You can walk to the community pool, a benefit included in community dues.  The public library, located next to the high school, is also an easy walk from Biltmore Park homes.

Community in Biltmore Park

This south Asheville neighborhood thrives on community connectivity.  Twice a year, there is a huge garage sale that draws people from all over the area.  There is also a Fourth of July parade for the children.  You can always make new friends at the community pool and park.

Proximity to Green Spaces

Biltmore Park is a wonderful neighborhood if you value proximity to green spaces and outdoor adventure.  The Mountain to Sea Trail, a trail that runs from the Great Smoky Mountains to North Carolina’s outer banks, runs right along the border of Biltmore Park.  Furthermore, it is approximately a ten minute drive to both the  North Carolina Arboretum and Bent Creek Trails and Experimental Forest.  Zen Tubing has a launch point on the French Broad River just across from the Arboretum’s entrance.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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View homes for sale in Biltmore Park


Sources and Further Reading: Biltmore Park Homeowners

Biltmore Park Planned Community



 

 

 


 


 

You Will Love These 5 Amazing Walkable Neighborhoods in Asheville

walkable neighborhoods

photo credit: gratisography

Considering a move to or within Asheville?  Here in the world of Asheville real estate, we are noticing a few trends that may seem familiar to you.  The first is the desire to live an eco-friendly lifestyle.  Another is a premium placed on convenience to alleviate the pressures of today’s busy schedules.  Enter the demand for walkable neighborhoods.

Aside from the obvious walkability of downtown Asheville’s historic and luxury condos, we would like to explore with you 5 other diverse walkable neighborhoods.

  1. Montford-Central

Montford homeMontford is an historic district just Northwest of downtown Asheville.  The main commercial corridor, Montford Avenue, is lined with enormous hardwoods and gorgeous homes, mostly from the early 1900s, in a vast array of architectural styles.  A handful of establishments such as Nine Mile Caribbean cuisine and Chiesa Italian restaurant make this neighborhood have a sense of community.  Additionally, there is a small park and a community center with tennis courts and wooded amphitheater, perfect for a stroll to entertainment.

  1. Grove Park-North

One of Asheville’s oldest and most distinguished planned neighborhoods, the Grove Park neighborhood, lies just North of downtown.  Charlotte Street serves as the vital avenue for this part of town.  Though this neighborhood is more elongated, stretching all the way to the Grove Park Inn, many residents can be seen taking the tree-lined sidewalks to the dining on Charlotte Street.  You can get the flavor of this neighborhood by checking out restaurants like the Asian cuisine of Ghanshan Station and pastries at City Bakery.

  1. West Asheville-West

Of all of these walkable neighborhoods, West Asheville has perhaps the most robust and distinctive mini-downtown area of its own.  Haywood Road is a revitalized thoroughfare lined with pubs, restaurants, and boutiques.  Bike corrals and pedestrian crossings encourage green forms of transportation.  Architectural styles range from smaller historic bungalows to mid century ranchers to newer green homes.  There are several parks, a public library, bookstore, yoga studio and more to walk to!

West Asheville Historic Home

  1. Biltmore Park-South

The newer south Asheville community of Biltmore Park neighborhood is a planned town center surrounded by a suburban neighborhood of larger homes built around 1990-2010.  The concept of this neighborhood was designed to promote smart growth and walkability.  Sidewalks are the norm and you can walk to many stores, restaurants and even a YMCA.  The mountains to sea trail even passes close by the edge of the neighborhood.

  1. River Arts District-Central

The River Arts District is one of Asheville’s newest revitalized areas.  Sitting along the banks of the French Broad River and criss-crossed with railroad tracks, it has long been an industrial area.  Manufacturing warehouses are slowly making way for artist’s studios and historic buildings are being rehabbed into breweries, restaurants and bars.  Sidewalks and bike lanes help pedestrians access downtown and the nearby river park.  Much of the housing in this area is either bungalow style homes, condos or studio apartments.

Mosaic Realty would love to help you find your place among Asheville’s walkable neighborhoods.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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6 Ways You can Build Community in Your Neighborhood | Asheville NC

Community Gathering

Of all of the facets that a buyer analyzes when considering a neighborhood, the quality of community relations is often overlooked.  Details such as heated square footage, lot size, updates and layout often predominate searches.  However, the nature of the community has a tremendous impact on many people’s enjoyment of their neighborhood.  Fortunately, community can be fostered!  Here are 6 tips for creating community-with an Asheville spin:

1. Create Common Spaces

With all of the emphasis in Western culture on drawing lines in the sand, if a few neighbors share a little space, it can create a world of difference in neighbor relations.  Creating a community garden with shared work and shared bounty provides continued opportunities for connecting.  Asheville has several stellar examples of community gardens.  Montford Community Garden in Montford Historic District and Falconhurst Community Garden in West Asheville are among these.  

Another trend in Asheville neighborhoods is the emergence of the Little Free Library movement.  There are over 20 registered free libraries within Asheville.  Stewards of neighborhood libraries place a small library somewhere on their property near the street.  It is the community’s responsibility and privilege to both keep the library stocked and enjoy its treasures.

Community GardenIndividuals can create common recreational areas in their yards and invite the community to enjoy it.  For example, put up a basketball goal in your cul de sac or driveway.  If you own a pool, create a flag system where you put up a green flag if you are willing to host open pool hours and a red flag if you want private pool time.

    2. Hold Regular Community Gatherings

Planned community gatherings, where there is an attempt made to include every neighbor, is a fantastic way to meet all of the individuals living near you.  Even if no one is willing to host a large group of people, park spaces and community centers make great gathering places.  Some churches and businesses are even willing to allow the use of their parking lot.  Several neighborhoods in Asheville have been known to host block parties by officially closing off their street for a few hours.

Some ideas for community gatherings are yearly yard sales like the ones held in Biltmore Park and Malvern Hills or community potlucks.  On Halloween, the neighborhood surrounding Vermont Avenue in Historic West Asheville goes to great lengths to decorate their homes and hand out tons of candy.  People come from far away to attend this community-hosted gathering.

     3.  Organize a Community Fundraiser

There is no greater way to really get to know your neighbors than to put your heads together and raise money for a cause.  The Montford neighborhood hosts an annual music and art festival where all proceeds go to fund community projects and activities of the Montford Neighborhood Association.  Malvern Hills neighborhood hosts an annual food drive, bringing hundreds of pounds of non-perishable items to MANNA food bank yearly.  

     4.  Volunteer together as a neighborhood

Stream Clean UpWith as many nonprofits as there are in Asheville, there are so many ways to rally your neighbors together in a group volunteer effort.  One of our favorite nonprofits, Asheville GreenWorks, is happy to outfit your group with all that you need to do a litter pick-up in your neighborhood.  River-Link is your go-to resource for adopting a stream in your neighborhood.

      5.  Create a Community-Friendly Front Yard

Instead of installing tall fences in your front yard, consider installing benches and half-walls good for sitting on.  Plant blueberry bushes and raspberry bushes near the front of the yard and encourage neighbors to help themselves.  Plant beautiful perennial borders both on the inside of your fence and on the outside for your neighbors to enjoy.  

      6.  Go Out on a Walk to Know Your Community

The easiest thing that you can do in your neighborhood to create community is to simply get out and stroll.  Stopping and talking with neighbors, delivering a newspaper to an elderly person’s door, and frequenting lemonade stands of neighborhood kids will let you make those invaluable connections.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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River Arts District Neighborhood of Asheville = RAD

River Arts District Asheville

Undeniably, the neighborhood in Asheville that is undergoing the most radical change at the moment is the River Arts District.

This district is situated just southwest of downtown Asheville, nestled between the bustling central business district, historic Biltmore Village and funky West Asheville.  The French Broad River defines the neighborhood’s western border and brings with it many eager river adventurers.  However, it has not always been quite the cultural hub that it is now.

History of the River Arts District in Asheville

Historic River Arts District AshevilleBy the late 1800s, Asheville’s industrial district had settled in the low-lying area surrounding the French Broad River.  During this time, the railroad, still active today as the Norfolk Southern, brought scores of people to town.

In the 1980s, as downtown Asheville began to see a slow renaissance and artists faced higher rents there, many of them set up shop in the industrial buildings lining the banks of the French Broad River.  1994 marked the first official studio stroll, and hence the name River Arts District began to take effect.  

Around the turn of the century, a few Asheville entrepreneurs began to recognize the opportunity in the area and set up businesses such as the Grey Eagle Music Hall and the Wedge Brewery, which are still thriving today.  The momentum has continued through the last 15 years with many businesses experiencing success in the area.

Today, there are plans for a Visitor’s Center with public parking and restrooms and many other improvements in the works.  The city was awarded a federal grant titled Tiger VI to improve transportation in and around the River District.  Ahead of the improved infrastructure, many local businesses are looking to be a part of this area.

River Arts District Culture

River Arts StudiosThis neighborhood is one of the most walkable neighborhoods in Asheville. (Link)  It’s friendliness to alternative transportation is only increasing as the city is investing more and more in infrastructure for greenways, sidewalks and bike lanes.  

The plethora of craft beers, artisan cocktails, fine dining and casual bites to eat is overwhelming and on the rise.  Our detailed blog post on river culture in Asheville lays out some of our favorite destinations in the River Arts District as well as some outstanding pass times.

Architectural Styles of the River Arts District

 Historic cottages dot the hillside of Chicken Hill, facing west over the river and south over the center of the business district.  In the past few years, some historic industrial buildings have been renovated to include studio apartments near artists’ studio spaces.  

New construction is popping up all along the River Arts District featuring mostly condos and modern style homes.  These homes are designed to reduce urban sprawl and to take advantage of the walkability of this neighborhood.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Sources/Further Reading: The History of the River Arts District

 

 

You Can be a Part of this Unique Asheville Re-Pollination Project!

 

4 x 4 Wild Patch Asheville non-profits

 

Asheville has a long history of attracting passionate, innovative individuals who seek to change the world for the better.  It is one of the myriad reasons that we, at Mosaic Realty, love Asheville.

 

4 x 4 for Wild!

 

One of Asheville's newest non-profits, 4 x 4 for Wild, embraces the concepts of community and connectivity with nature that so many Ashevillians share.  Concerned about the rapid loss of habitat and decline of monarch butterflies and other pollinators, founders Mike and Moni Hill are working to combat the problem on a local level, with plans to expand their reach.  4X4 for Wild is an Asheville-based non-profit with a goal of creating pollinator habitat in lawns across the region.

 

The Mission:

 

  • To create habitat for native pollinators by providing affordable and accessible "wild patch" solutions

 

  • To raise ecological awareness through education and public outreach

 

  • To change the preferred aesthetic from lawn to wildness

4 x 4 wild patch Asheville real estate

 

The Process:

 

The 4x 4 for Wild team is happy to loop you into this project. It takes them 10 minutes to install, and they request only a $10 donation to cover expenses.

 

The product is a complete wild patch kit, consisting of a biodegradable paper bag (for weed and grass barrier), wood chips/mulch, planting mix, wildflower seeds (including common milkweed for monarch butterflies), stakes and string, and an attractive sign.

 

The Result:

 

Your 4x4 wild patch will give pollinators a point of connectivity in their migration path.  It will give your neighborhood a sense of community empowerment as more and more people pull together in this effort. Finally, it will give you 16 square feet of beautiful, wild habitat to enjoy throughout the growing season. Projects like this that make living in Asheville so amazing!

 

For more information on this grass-roots movement, get in touch wtih Mike and Moni at www.4X4forwild.org or www.facebook.com/4X4forwild

 

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at  mike@mymosaicrealty.com   or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

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Ventana: The Peak of Comfort and Convenience in Asheville

Ventana Asheville blue skies

Daily life can get quite hectic, even in easy-going Asheville. But you can rise above it all – quite literally – in the neighborhood of Ventana. Nestled in the Blue Ridge at an elevation of 3,000 feet, the North Asheville neighborhood offers a private, gated community of uniquely luxurious homes situated seamlessly in a stunningly scenic setting. And one of the best parts? Easy access to town. What may feel like a remote, peaceful spot worlds away from the commercial hubs of Asheville is actually a mere three minutes from the Merrimon Avenue shopping corridor, and eight minutes from downtown Asheville.

An Asheville Rarity: Mountain Views, Close to Town

Ventana Rear Elevation Samsel PlanVery few neighborhoods positioned so close to downtown Asheville can boast the beautiful mountain views Ventana offers. Add to that the natural beauty of majestic forests and winding streams residents can take in from the comfort of their homes, and you’ve got a truly unique enclave. But even as the neighborhood has grown, it has maintained one overarching philosophy: minimizing the impact of building on the surrounding landscape. From the moment construction begins, architectural and site design aim to create continuity and quality throughout the neighborhood, while preserving the natural beauty of the existing landscape and community. Green building and sustainability are highlighted throughout the area.

Ventana Entrance GateThe forests surrounding Ventana are a standout feature, specifically because the homes’ material use and color palettes blend seamlessly and unobtrusively. Ventana’s architectural and site design philosophy aims to educate owners, builders and architects on ways to protect the natural beauty and resources through the building process and beyond. Low association dues (to cover the maintenance of the common areas, gate and private paved roads, trail system, and gas street lamps) ensure that this design philosophy is consistently maintained, for the benefit of residents and environment alike.

Despite being low density, the neighborhood has a high level of infrastructure, including city water, city sewer, natural gas, electric and phone all installed underground. Prospective residents select from vacant lots and pre-construction packages (land plus home) from a group of three competing builders, but they can choose to use their own builder provided they follow Ventana’s architectural guidelines.

Amenities, Mere Minutes Away

Living in Ventana means you’re just a few minutes from the commercial corridor of Merrimon Avenue, replete with grocery stores (Ingles, GreenLife, Trader Joe’s, Fresh Market and Harris Teeter) and restaurants (Vinnie’s Neighborhood Italian, Luella’s Bar-B-Que, Plant, HomeGrown, Asheville Pizza and Brewing Co. and Marco’s Pizzeria, to name just a few). And just a few minutes beyond that lies downtown Asheville, where you can enjoy all the entertainment, fine dining and shopping the urban hub has to offer.

For the outdoor enthusiast, having a home in Ventana puts you at the foot of heaven: think winding, stream-lined walking paths throughout the community, a number of nearby hiking trails, and easy access to the French Broad River and all the water sports it has to offer.

For a personally guided tour of Ventana, contact Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty’s William Yeager, the exclusive listing agent for Ventana’s developer, at William@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him at 828-450-0140. You can also contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him at (828) 337-8190.

Wonderful, Whimsical, Welcoming West Asheville

West Asheville Neighborhoods

Nowhere is the booming growth of Asheville more evident than in eclectic West Asheville. Home to hip stores, renowned restaurants, a vibrant music scene, and every type of residence, from quaint bungalows to vertical green builds, West Asheville continues to draw a wide range of fans to its whimsical, walkable neighborhoods.

Lots to Do, See, Hear and Taste in West Asheville

Historic West AshevilleSlicing through West Asheville is the vibrant thoroughfare of Haywood Road, the area’s main artery for more than 100 years. Mom-and-pop shops stand alongside an influx of newer businesses – everything from retro arcades to artist co-ops to bike and skate shops to music halls have found their way to Haywood. Even with the seismic shifts the street has seen, it still retains a small hometown air. Residents of the many West Asheville neighborhoods that border Haywood can, in mere minutes, walk to restaurants, bars, grocery stores, schools, parks and other amenities – making it all the easier to truly experience the area’s energy and sense of community.

West Asheville has a Neighborhood for Everyone

Tucked throughout West Asheville are various neighborhoods boasting beautiful homes appealing to a range of desires and aesthetics. Whether you’re looking for a green build with proximity to playgrounds for your young children, a bungalow within walking distance of after-work hotspots, or a space with easy access to greenways, West Asheville won’t disappoint. A few of its neighborhoods include:

·       Falconhurst: Located north of downtown West Asheville, bordered on the east by Louisiana Avenue, on the south by Haywood Road, on the west by Mitchell and Druid avenues, and on the north by Patton Avenue, Falconhurst has continued to develop as an attractive neighborhood for families. In recent years, Falconhurst has become a more active community, thanks to the formation of a community garden by local residents.

·       East West Asheville: Encompassing the area between I-240 and the French Broad River, East West Asheville indulges the greenway and park lover with easy access to the French Broad River Park and Greenway as well as Carrier Park. Homes perched along the periphery boast views of the Biltmore Estate across the river. Also nearby is Hall Fletcher Elementary School.

West Asheville Parks·       Malvern Hills: This neighborhood, bordered by Bear Creek Road on the east, Wendover Road on the south, and School Road on the north, has just over 200 houses within its boundaries. It has three community-maintained landscaped islands, one with a rose garden, where residents congregate during neighborhood gatherings. The architecture is a pleasant mix of larger, stately 1920s homes, small bungalows, brick tudor cottages, and mid-century ranch houses.

·       Horney Heights: This neighborhood surrounding the Malvern Hills swimming pool and tennis courts represents the quintessential small-town, tight-knit community. Populated primarily by cottages and bungalows, Horney Heights offers great access to West Asheville’s many restaurants and bars, a public library, and Vance Elementary School, but feels worlds away from the hustle and bustle.  

·       Morningside Park: Loosely encompassing the Morningside Drive loop, and with easy access to I-26 and I-40, Morningside Park boasts a mix of bungalows, new green builds, and stately brick homes. West Asheville Park and ball field are a short walk away.

.       Craggy Park is a new sustainable community in urban West Asheville, just North of the Haywood Road business district. It consists of 45 new Energy Star certified JAG Construction homes in a low impact development. The community uses a clustered home site plan in order to create community gathering spaces and to preserve green spaces. Community amenities include a fire pit, community garden, little free libraries, lawn near a stream and walking trails. As of summer 2017, the first few homes will be hitting the market. 

·       West Asheville Estates: This neighborhood, bisected by the wide and welcoming Vermont Avenue, gives residents easy access to both Brevard and Haywood roads. Francine Delany New School is also located here.

For a personally guided tour of West Asheville, or for more information on real estate here or anywhere in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.