historic neighborhoods

Explore Historic Neighborhoods in Asheville

Montford Colonial Revival

Asheville, North Carolina is lucky to have a number of well-preserved historic districts among its many and varied neighborhoods.  Gorgeous examples of diverse styles of architecture are represented throughout these communities.  Many of them are graced with sidewalks, small businesses, public parks and are desirable for their walkability.

If you are considering buying an historic home for its aesthetic benefits and unmatched architecture, or simply curious about these majestic abodes, take a look the 8 historic neighborhoods featured here.

Historic Kenilworth

KenilworthThis lovely neighborhood sits perched atop some rolling hills just south of downtown Asheville.  Bungalows and other larger homes, mostly built in the 1920s, define the architectural style. There are also some prime examples of Spanish architecture found among the huge hardwoods.

The neighborhood’s location near the hospital, downtown Asheville and Biltmore Village make it convenient for many professionals.  There is also a public park and a small lake with peaceful views nestled in the center of the community.

Montford Historic District

MontfordThis centrally-located neighborhood is just a stone’s throw outside of downtown Asheville.  It had its heyday at the turn of the 20th century with many of the city’s professionals built large and colorful homes along the central corridor of Montford Avenue and its surrounding blocks.  

Today, some of the largest homes are now operating as bed and breakfast establishments, but most are still single family residences.  Homes in architectural styles such as Victorian, Queen Anne, Arts and Crafts and Neoclassical sit majestically overlooking the tree-lined streets.

Beaverdam

BeaverdamThe Beaverdam neighborhood is located in a gorgeous valley to the north of downtown.  The opening of the valley is conveniently located off of Merrimon Avenue, a straight shot into downtown and all of the conveniences it offers.  The back of the valley leads up to the Blue Ridge Parkway for easy access to hiking and biking in America’s most visited national park.

The historic homes in this valley are mostly a farmhouse style in a pastoral setting.  If you follow Beaverdam Road, parallel to Beaverdam Creek, you can glimpse some of these vintage farmhouses and cabins.

LakeView Park

Lake View ParkThis community of 485 homes surrounding Beaver Lake and Park in north Asheville has a blend of architectural styles and a good number of historical homes, built mostly in the 1920s, among the residences.  

The lake itself was created in 1923 by esteemed urban planner and architect John Nolen.  The lake and its surrounding trail system are privately owned and maintained by residents of Lakeview Park. This neighborhood offers proximity to downtown Asheville in balance with serene lakeside living.

 

Historic Grove Park Neighborhood

Grove ParkThis classic North Asheville neighborhood is known for its stately homes, Grove Park Inn golf course vistas and immaculately landscaped terraced yards.  Designed and developed by Edwin Wiley Grove, this area incorporates Neoclassical, Colonial Revival, Tudor Revival and Bungalow styles of architecture among others.

The famous Grove Park Inn sits on the hillside overlooking the central thoroughfare of Kimberly Avenue.  Several restaurants and bars provide meeting spots for locals along Charlotte Street.

Biltmore Forest

Biltmore ForestBiltmore Forest, once a part of the Biltmore Estate, is not only a neighborhood, but actually a town of almost three square miles as well.  It is located between the Biltmore Estate and the Blue Ridge Parkway and is characterized by its enormous hardwood trees.

The first homes were built around 1923 on White Oak Road.  While there are newer sections of the neighborhood, the areas closest to Biltmore Village and Hendersonville Road feature large historic homes on generous lots.

Biltmore Village

Biltmore VillageHistoric Biltmore Village was initially created as a community for the workers of the Biltmore Estate during its late 19th century construction. The architectural style is very unique with its pebbledash post and beam walls, high pitched roofs and heavy stone foundations inspired by Biltmore Estate architect Richard Sharp Smith.

Though the village is largely filled with businesses at this point, there are a few residences in the community that can enjoy the convenience of a completely walkable neighborhood.

Historic West Asheville

West Asheville HistoricHistoric West Asheville has a style entirely its own.  Many of the homes in this district were built in the 1920s in a bungalow style with large front porches and low-hanging eaves.  In recent decades, the area has undergone a kind of renaissance with people renovating many of these historic homes and revitalizing the central business corridor on Haywood Road, a lively downtown of its own.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

Search: View all homes for sale in Asheville

Comments

  1. graha grand on

    Great Blog,Thanks for sharing and keep rocking...

    4 Benefits of Buying a Historic Home in Asheville

    Historic Home Kenilworth Asheville

    Part of the wide appeal of Asheville is its aesthetic.  Though it is a small city, nestled among the ancient Blue Ridge Mountains, it draws in flocks of tourists.  Many of these tourists eventually make their way into the charming historic neighborhoods of Asheville and are drawn in by the architectural beauty of these well-preserved homes. This is evidenced by the quickly growing population and popularity of Asheville.

    The Craftsmanship and Strength of Historic Homes is Unmatched

    Unique Coffered Ceiling DesignOlder homes, particularly those that were built before World War 1, are typically built of much higher quality materials than newer homes.  You will often find rare hardwoods such as heart pine and wood from old-growth forests.  Rare gems such as copper adornments and opalescent glass exemplify the handmade nature of these buildings.

    America is currently undergoing a type of downtown revival.  Residents and tourists alike are enjoying the cultural hub provided by historic centers.  Start-up businesses such as bookstores and restaurants are thriving in these historic locations.  Historic neighborhoods close to these city centers are increasingly appealing for their vibrancy and walkability.

    Possible Tax Incentives

    As of January of 2016, the North Carolina legislature has put into effect a historic rehabilitation tax credit program.  This program provides a great incentive to taxpayers who rehabilitate their homes or income-producing properties.  These incentives for improving historic structures are an important tool for historic preservation in North Carolina.  Additionally, a federal tax credit for the rehabilitation of historic homes consists of a 20% credit for qualifying income-producing historic properties that have been rehabilitated.

    Adaptive Reuse is Environmentally Friendly

    Far superior to demolition, the concept of adaptive reuse encourages people to preserve the structural assets in place.  This saves a lot of energy that goes into the manufacture, transportation and assembly of new building materials.  Historical buildings’ energy efficiency can always be improved upon, and the latest building technologies are making that increasingly easy.

    You Are Preserving History

    Ideal Yard for Pets and PlayAsheville is a place of deep-rooted history.  A small group of big-dreaming activists played a large role in helping to stop the demolition of many of downtown Asheville’s historic buildings to put in a strip mall.  Fortunately, they were able to stop the destruction, and preservationists stepped in with a Public Works program that encouraged business owners to preserve the historic buildings and create businesses within their walls.  Today, Asheville has a vibrant downtown and many of the businesses are housed in architecturally astounding structures.

    Similarly, many devoted homeowners have moved into the many historic neighborhoods around Asheville, and with a little TLC, have preserved these stately homes.  Examples of this can bee seen in the Victorian and Queen Anne homes in Montford, pebble dash cottages in Biltmore Village, charming bungalows in West Asheville and Colonial Revival and Tudor homes of Grove Park, among many others.

    For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

    Search: View all homes for sale in Asheville

    Sources and Further Reading: National Trust for Historic Preservation 

    Preservation North Carolina