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Asheville's Oakley Offers Alluring Amenities, Attractive Home Prices

Oakley Neighborhood Asheville NC

Tucked between the Blue Ridge Parkway and Historic Biltmore Village, and just minutes from downtown Asheville, sits the welcoming neighborhood of Oakley. A seamless blend of remodeled bungalows and newly constructed craftsman-style homes gives Oakley a distinct, close-knit feel. Residents can walk to the Oakley Library, spend an afternoon working in the community garden, or enjoy the area’s easy proximity to shopping, recreation, the Blue Ridge Parkway and the Folk Art Center.

But amenities aren’t the only thing Oakley boasts: Its allure also lies in home pricing. According to Mosaic Realty first-quarter data for this 2019, the median Asheville home price was $295,000, which is where the price of a home in Oakley falls. With many properties in Oakley featuring greater-than-average acreage, and new home developments priced moderately, more buyers are being drawn to the neighborhood.

Activities for Everyone in Oakley

Proximity to the Blue Ridge ParkwayBeing close to the Blue Ridge Parkway is a major advantage to calling Oakley home. Take a short drive east, and you’re assured quick access to such popular parkway spots as the hiking destination of Haw Creek Valley Overlook (milepost 380) and the Folk Art Center (milepost 382). Historic Biltmore Village – with its many shops and restaurants – and the Biltmore Estate are just down the road, offering Oakley residents lots to experience in their own backyard. The 42-acre Western North Carolina Nature Center, mere minutes away, provides plenty of family fun with more than 60 species of animals to see.

Oakley families enjoy many educational and enrichment options. The well-regarded Oakley Elementary School, as well as the top-rated Reynolds Middle and High Schools, serve the neighborhood. Other educational options include nearby charter schools Evergreen Community Charter School and ArtSpace Charter School. The popular Roots & Wings School of Art and Design sits in the heart of Oakley, and offers enrichment opportunities for every age, from preschool for tiny tots, to after-school community design lab for big kids, to adult studio classes.

Accessible Amenities

A long list of stores a short drive away means Oakley residents never have to travel far to find what they need. Home Depot and Walmart Supercenter are nearby, as are the River Ridge Market Place (featuring such stores as AC Moore and Dollar General) and Oakley Plaza (featuring Gold’s Gym). For a fun-filled evening of music and mingling, residents can head to nearby Highland Brewing Company.

Sandra Brooks Asheville Realtor OakleyWith the close-by commercial corridor of Tunnel Road, Oakley offers an amazing array of shopping and entertainment outlets within a few minutes’ drive. The Asheville Mall, as well as big-name chains like Best Buy, Lowes, Bed Bath & Beyond and Whole Foods, mingle with smaller boutiques and specialty stores to offer the ultimate retail mix. Movie theaters and a bowling alley provide rainy afternoon entertainment for the entire family. And just a 10-minute drive west, via I-240, puts you in the heart of Downtown Asheville, with its vibrant restaurant, retail and arts scene.

A home purchase in Oakley makes sense for anyone looking for a convenient neighborhood destined to appreciate in the coming years. For a personally guided tour of Oakley, please contact Mosaic Realty agent Sandra Brooks at or call her anytime at 828-333-2500.

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Now's the Time to Create Your Perfect Home in West Asheville's Malvern Walk

Malvern Walk West Asheville Real Estate

Looking to build or buy a home in a new-construction community with larger lots, eco-friendly green homes, and easy access to parks and greenways? Come visit Malvern Walk, nestled amid picturesque rolling hills in popular West Asheville. With improved pricing on lots, it’s never been easier to build your dream custom home or a spacious spec house .

Malvern Walk – located within one of Asheville’s original historic neighborhoods – has 30 lots, all a quarter acre or larger. With 10 homes completed or under construction and the new release of five shovel-ready lots, now is the perfect time to claim a piece of this inviting neighborhood for yourself.

Malvern Walk Asheville NeighborhoodA Rarity in West Asheville

Boasting broad sky views and an accessible community to delight walkers, cyclists and gardeners alike, Malvern Walk offers the rare opportunity to build a dream home in West Asheville’s original historic large-lot subdivision. All utilities are installed to the lots, including water, sewer, cable, fiber optics and natural gas. The lots are graded, and the driveway entrances have been installed, making planning and construction easy.

Malvern Walk’s design promotes walking and biking as a means of relaxation as well as a mode of transportation. An interior mulched path ties seamlessly to the Malvern Hills neighborhood, where sidewalks and quiet streets provide the perfect setting for a morning jog or an evening stroll.

Perfect Proximity, but Away from the Hustle

Malvern Walk West Asheville HomesResidents can take advantage of the neighborhood’s short distance to multiple parks, the local library, coffee shops, restaurants, live music and more in West Asheville’s own “downtown,” the dynamic Haywood Road commercial corridor. Along this lively thoroughfare, mom-and-pop shops stand alongside an influx of newer businesses – everything from retro arcades to artist co-ops to bike and skate shops to music halls have found their way to Haywood.

With quick access to interstates and downtown Asheville, Malvern Walk offers the best in proximity without being in the middle of the hustle of Asheville’s urban center. Living in Malvern Walk means being able to hop on the Hominy Creek greenway and connect to Asheville’s river parks with ease. In addition, it’s only a short drive to hiking in Pisgah Forest or biking on the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Closer to home are the Malvern Hills swimming pool, tennis court and playground. A number of well-regarded schools within a short distance – including Vance Elementary School, Francine Delany New School for Children, Rainbow Community School and Asheville City Preschool, just to name a few – make Malvern Walk ideal for families.

For a personally guided tour of Malvern Walk, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Green Yard, Green World: How to Create an Eco-Friendly Landscape

Pollinators Eco-Friendly Backyard

Creating a backyard that’s enjoyable for you and friendly to the Earth is easier than you think. From pollinator gardens to organic mulching to smart watering, taking an environmentally sound approach to landscaping helps to promote a green yard – and a greener world. Following, some simple tips to try:

Choose Native Plants

Populate your yard with plants native to Western North Carolina and you’ll be providing habitat for many beneficial local animals and insects. In addition, native plants are already acclimated to the region’s climate, and are naturally resistant to local pests and disease. All of this means they don’t require fertilizers or extra watering, which makes them eco-friendly. Native trees and plants to try in your Asheville yard include southern magnolia, flowering dogwood, redbud, cardinal flower, oakleaf hydrangea and foamflower –the list goes on and on. Visit local farmers’ markets, local plant vendors, or the Botanical Gardens at Asheville to get an idea of which native plants will work for your yard.

MilkweedPlant Pollinator Gardens

Pollinator gardens – with specific nectar- and pollen-producing plants – are designed to attract beneficial insects and animals to pollinate, thus performing an important step in the food and flower cycle. Because pollinator habitat has been lost to urban development, pollution, climate change and other adverse action, the population of many pollinator species is at risk. Flowers with large “landing pads,” plants with many small flowers, and plants that bloom very early or very late (when attractive pollination options are scarce) are all good options for your pollinator garden.

Use Plenty of Mulch

Using mulch helps to keep soil temperature consistent, retain moisture, and inhibit weed growth. As organic mulch like wood chips, bark leaves and pine needles breaks down, it adds nutrients to the soil. Bonus: Using more mulch means you can get away with growing less grass, which requires a lot of water to maintain.

Eschew Fertilizers

Dumping large amounts of chemicals onto your lawn via popular “weed and feed” products could put the environment, your health, and eventually the condition of your lawn at risk. A better option is to use organic fertilizer or, better yet, eliminate fertilizer and instead use compost and organic matter in your soil, aerate, cut grass on a higher setting, and incorporate low-maintenance moss and groundcover into your landscape.

Rain Barrel Eco-Friendly BackyardWater

There are many ways to water smart and still keep your yard happy. Harvesting rainwater via a rain barrel, cistern or rain chain means you’ll be using much less household water. When you water, make sure to do it in the morning before the temperatures start to climb and threaten the moisture. If you water in the late afternoon, make sure foliage has time to dry to avoid fungal diseases that thrive in damp nights. Water plants near the base rather than overhead, to better target the roots.

To learn about Real Estate in Asheville, NC, contact Mosaic Realty owner Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him anytime at 828-337-8190.

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Western N.C.'s Varied Yet Temperate Climate Lets Seasons Shine

Asheville NC Climate

Photo credit: Evan Kafka

Life in Western North Carolina offers up a refreshing range of weather experiences. Asheville, at an elevation of just above 2,000 feet, boasts an overall mild year-round climate – not too cold in the winter, not too hot in the summer – but traveling just a short distance outside of the city can reveal a greater fluctuation in temperature and precipitation.

Because the area boasts a full four seasons, weather-dependent activities thrive here. It’s easy to enjoy fall foliage, winter skiing, and spring and summer hiking and swimming thanks to the region’s seasonal changes.

Higher Elevations in Western North Carolina, Greater Differences

While the city is quite temperate – Asheville sits in a relatively dry and protected spot along the French Broad River Valley – traveling higher into the surrounding Blue Ridge Mountains promises greater weather variations. It’s not uncommon to encounter sudden clouds and fog, snow on the ground, a rain shower, or a 20-degree temperature drop in a single drive up the Blue Ridge Parkway. It’s windier in the higher elevations, and nighttime temperatures can still dip into the 30s during springtime.

While Asheville experiences the seasons to the fullest, weather extremes rarely occur. When they do, they’re not sustained. Snowfalls in the city are sporadic, and the snow melts quickly, with an average annual accumulation of 10 inches. Higher elevations, however, see heavier snowfalls, along with icing that can close roads for extended periods. The cold season in Asheville is from late November to late February, with an average daily high in the mid-50s. During the coldest point of the year, night temperatures can dip into single digits, but generally, they hover in the 30s.

The warm season in Asheville lasts from late May to mid-September, and even though temperatures can hit the upper 80s to 90s during the hottest periods, the average daily high is 76 degrees. While summers can be humid in town, higher elevations offer cooler forests, streams and waterfalls for respite.

Climate of Western North CarolinaA Range of Rainfall Amounts Around Asheville

Rainfall varies widely across the region: Asheville gets an average of 44 inches of rain per year, but surrounding areas like Brevard and its forests can get around 67 inches. Spring, which begins relatively early in Western North Carolina, is usually the wettest season of the year. Tropical systems can affect the region in late summer and early fall, resulting in heavy rainfall and forceful winds.

The driest time of year in Western North Carolina is autumn. Cooler temperatures (60s to low 70s) and crisper, clearer air create the perfect conditions for producing brilliant, sustained fall foliage. The best colors come forth from late September at the higher elevations to late October and early November in the valleys.

Eager to experience Asheville’s climate year-round? Please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190 to learn about available real estate options in Asheville and the surrounding areas.

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This Summer, Swim Spots Make a Splash in Asheville

Recreation Park Pool Asheville

Hot weather is almost here, and the Asheville area’s many water destinations – both man-made and natural – are sure to help your summer go swimmingly. Following is a list of the best spots to cool off when temperatures heat up.

City of Asheville Pools

Malvern Hills Pool AshevilleThree public outdoor pools – Malvern Hills, Recreation Park and Walton Street – provide safe and affordable outdoor summer fun for children and adults. The pools have varied schedules, but generally are open early June through early September. General admission is $3, a 15-visit pass is $40, an individual season pass is $100, and a family season pass is $150. All three pools also offer two sessions of free swim lessons for school-age children (registration required).

In addition, there are swimming pool events throughout the summer, including $1 Dip Days at Malvern Hills and Rec Park, Float Days (all pools), and the Sixth Annual Doggie Dip day at Rec Park. For more information, and to register for swim lessons, visit https://www.ashevillenc.gov/departments/parks/pools_n_splasheville.htm. Malvern Hills is located at 75 Rumbough Place, in West Asheville; Recreation Park at 65 Gashes Creek Road, by the Nature Center; and Walton Street at 570 Walton Street, near the River Arts District.

Splasheville

The City of Asheville's interactive splash play fountain in downtown’s Pack Square Park features 21 jets of water that run in 12 combinations for hours of fun. The fountain usually operates from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week from April through September. https://www.ashevillenc.gov/departments/parks/pools_n_splasheville.htm

Buncombe County Recreation Services Pools

Asheville Public Pools and FountainsBuncombe County boasts five outdoor public pools that will open for the season May 25. Cost to swim is $3 per day for Buncombe County residents. Discounted multi-visit passes are also available at each pool. Bonus: The pools are set against stunning mountain backdrops, so you can drink in the view while you enjoy the water. Cane Creek Pool is located at 590 Lower Brush Creek Road in Fletcher, Erwin Pool, 58 Lees Creek Road, Asheville; Hominy Valley Pool, 25 Twin Lakes Road, Candler; North Buncombe Pool, 892 Clarks Chapel Road, Weaverville; and Owen Pool, 117 Stone Drive, Swannanoa. https://www.buncombecounty.org/governing/depts/parks/facilities/pools/default.aspx

In-Town Swimming Hole

For a more natural water experience, nothing beats a dip in a swimming hole. But if you don’t have time to drive out to a waterfall in Dupont State Forest or Pisgah National Forest, Azalea Park, on Asheville’s east side, offers an ideal in-town alternative. While the swimming hole – along a stretch of the Swannanoa River that borders the park – is not officially maintained by the city, it draws a crowd with its light current, perfect for a refreshing stop on a hot day. Bonus: There are bathrooms and a playground at the park, so you can make a day of your dip. The park is located at 498 Azalea Road East in Asheville.

For information about Real Estate in Asheville, contact Mosaic Realty owner Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him anytime at 828-337-8190.

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Small-Business Support Makes Asheville Work for Entrepreneurs

Asheville Small Business Resources

“Go Local” – it’s a mantra Asheville truly takes to heart. The passionate support and strong nurturing of small businesses and the self-employed make the area fertile ground for those looking to bring an entrepreneurial idea to fruition. Asheville offers those who want to start a business or grow their at-home operation the tools necessary to do so successfully. Whether its loans, classes or coaching, if you’re seeking small-business support, Asheville is the ideal place to be.

Mountain BizWorks

Mountain BizWorks envisions a thriving Western North Carolina in which small-business owners and aspiring entrepreneurs have access to the resources needed to make their dreams a reality.

A U.S. Treasury-certified non-profit community development financial institution, Mountain BizWorks makes business loans ranging from $1,000 to $250,000 to small businesses in Western North Carolina who may find it difficult to secure funding from banks and other traditional sources. All loan decisions and relationships are managed locally, with customized, peer-to-peer business coaching by an extensive network of local, successful business owners. This innovative blend of lending and learning helps entrepreneurs overcome obstacles, grow strategically, and create jobs.

Asheville NC Small BusinessMountain BizWorks also offers a platform of three flagship courses to support aspiring and existing small-business owners on their journey from startup to sustainable growth. The courses are led by experienced small-business owners and use a participatory, supportive learning environment to deliver relevant, actionable skills and tools to further business goals. Each program is also designed to create a network of peers from which to gain ideas, support and feedback along the way. https://www.mountainbizworks.org

A-B Tech Small Business Center

The Small Business Center at A-B Tech Enka is part of the statewide Small Business Center Network, a community college-funded initiative with a vision to foster and support entrepreneurship and small-business and economic development in local communities with an emphasis on assisting start-ups, early stage, and at-risk enterprises.  

The Small Business Center provides a variety of training, including free business seminars, interactive workshops, and classes. Training is available on many business topics including basic bookkeeping, software training, Web design, marketing analysis, utilizing Google pay-per-click tools, WordPress, business-management training, international product export services, craft business development, and more.  Most of the business workshops and seminars are free, with some advanced topics available for a nominal fee.

Asheville New BusinessesThe center also provides free, one-on-one confidential counseling for small-business and startup ventures, in the areas of business law, planning, business coaching, business development and growth, problem-solving, and cash flow management. The center also offers access to free professional services involving individualized counseling and advice with area professionals. https://www.abtech.edu/small-business-center/services-and-resources

Asheville Chamber of Commerce

The Chamber of Commerce pools many tools together to assist small-business owners, creating a curated set of resources specifically geared toward helping businesses in all stages of growth succeed. Included is a directory of Asheville Area Chamber of Commerce member businesses such as banks, legal firms, real-estate agents, and business counselors and consultants that can assist with the needs of small businesses.

The chamber’s research department can provide data necessary to make impactful business decisions, as well as information helpful to location selection, industry competitors and much more. The chamber’s business startup and counseling service helps hundreds of companies every year make key connections and plan next steps on the path to entrepreneurship.

For information about living in Asheville and Real Estate in Asheville, contact Mosaic Realty owner Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him anytime at 828-337-8190. We can also help find you some commercial real estate to locate your small business. 

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N.C. Arboretum Blossoms with “Covered in Color” Celebration

NC Arboretum Compositions of Color

From May 25 to Sept. 2, the North Carolina Arboretum will be blanketed in a canvas of color and creativity as it presents its 2019 Covered in Color summer celebration. Visitors to the 434-acre public garden, adjacent to the Blue Ridge Parkway and just minutes from downtown Asheville, will find themselves fully immersed in the broad spectrum of color found in flowers and foliage while learning about color theory and design through floral displays, art, creative landscapes, guided programs and more. Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty is a proud sponsor of the event.

“From plants to animals to the sky, color plays a significant role in our natural environment,” said George Briggs, executive director of the Arboretum. “Through our Covered in Color celebration, we hope to educate visitors about the power of color in the landscape and how it impacts the way we see, experience and enjoy nature.”

Art intertwined with nature

Covered in Color NC Arboretum ExhibitIn conjunction with the Covered in Color celebration, the Arboretum will present Compositions of Color, an exhibit by renowned Asheville-based artist Leo Monahan. Showcasing the complex composition of art and music through various representations of paper-made guitars and other images, the presentation will be on display in the Baker Exhibit Center. In the Arboretum’s Exhibit Greenhouse, color-themed plantings will accompany a special student photography exhibit, Nature’s Palette, which will feature images of colors found in nature captured by K-8 students participating in the Arboretum’s ecoEXPLORE citizen-science program.

Asheville’s vibrancy on display

As part of the Covered in Color celebration, visitors can join in a special Colorful Asheville tour. On Thursdays and Saturdays from June through August, the tour will offer an inside look into the vibrant creations that make Asheville the unique art destination that it is. Included in the package are a guided color-themed tour of the Arboretum, lunch at Bent Creek Bistro, and a personalized dye workshop at WAXON Studios. Tickets for the half-day experience are $125 per person and can be purchased at www.leapfrogtours.com.

To learn about Real Estate in Asheville, contact Mosaic Realty owner Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him anytime at 828-337-8190.

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What is a Comparative Market Analysis When Selling a Home?

Comparative Market Analysis

When it comes time to buy or sell a home, you have a multitude of tools to garner the best possible financial outcome for the transaction. One of those tools is a comparative market analysis. But what exactly is a CMA, and how can you execute one that covers all the bases?

What is a comparative market analysis?

Home Value Real EstateA CMA is a thorough examination of final sale prices that similar properties in the immediate area recently commanded. These properties should ideally have the same number of bedrooms and bathrooms, and be sized within 200 square feet and situated within a quarter-mile of your property. They should also be within your zip code and school district, if possible. Utilizing these comparatives can help you to accurately and attractively price your own home.

One key to an accurate analysis is taking into account recent sales, since the real-estate market is ever-changing. It’s advisable not to go back any more than six months. Another key is to make sure the prices analyzed are final sale prices, and not listing prices. That way, you’re not factoring into your analysis inflated, pie-in-the-sky numbers of what sellers hope to make.

How is a CMA different from an appraisal?

A CMA may sound similar to an appraisal, but there are some key differences. While CMAs help to determine a fair asking price, appraisals are used by banks to determine an appropriate amount of money to lend for a mortgage after a buyer makes an offer.

Because of the more official nature of appraisals, it’s extremely important they to be done correctly: A faulty appraisal can lead to mortgage fraud and lawsuits. A sub-par CMA can delay or even kill a sale, but there’s no legal hot water tied to it. As a result, appraisals are performed by those state-certified to do so. A CMA can be performed by the homeowner – but it makes sense to hire a real estate agent to do the work for you.

Why hire an agent to perform a CMA?

Asheville Homes for SaleYou could perform your own CMA, but having a real-estate agent to do it will leave you with a more comprehensive analysis. There are online tools available to homeowners – automated home value estimators, for example – but these tools just skim the surface. An agent can dig into data not readily available to you.

If you’re looking to sell (or buy) a home in Asheville, any of the agents at Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty are fully equipped to perform a thorough CMA of your property. Their keen knowledge of Asheville’s many neighborhoods, along with their varied expertise, means you’ll get a detailed, all-encompassing CMA that only someone well-versed in the local market can provide. For more information on CMAs, or for more information on real estate in the Asheville area, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Perfect Proximity to Desirable Destinations Puts Asheville on the Map

Asheville NC Blue Ridge Mountains

An amazingly eclectic food scene, rich cultural offerings, and an abundance of outdoor activities – all set against a monumental Blue Ridge backdrop – make Asheville, N.C., a destination unto itself. But Asheville’s proximity to attractions outside the city also makes it the ideal locale to set up a home base. From quaint coastal towns to big-city spots, for Ashevillians, a change of scenery is only a simple drive away.

Asheville NC LocationWhere is Asheville, N.C., located?

Situated in the western part of North Carolina, Asheville is nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains at the confluence of the Swannanoa and French Broad rivers. The county seat of Buncombe County, Asheville is the largest city in western N.C., with a population of 91,000.

Asheville has a number of neighboring communities perfect for a quick afternoon of exploration. Arden, Biltmore Forest, Black Mountain, Enka, Fairview, Montreat, Swannanoa and Weaverville are all less than a 30-minute drive from Asheville, and offer appealing activities for the entire family.

How far is Asheville from the mountains?

The Blue Ridge Mountains, part of the Appalachian Mountains range, cover most of western N.C. While the Blue Ridge Mountains stretch from Georgia to Pennsylvania, the highest peaks are found around Asheville, which is itself at 2,134 feet. Mt. Mitchell (31 miles from Asheville via the Blue Ridge Parkway) is the highest point east of the Mississippi River (at 6,684 feet).

Five entrances to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park – including Cataloochee Valley, Balsam Mountain and Big Creek – are within 70 miles of Asheville. That means you can enjoy a day trip to this national gem, with free entry.

How far is Asheville from the beach?

Asheville’s reasonable proximity to the Carolina coast means you can easily make a weekend trip to the region’s many popular beaches. Keep in mind that, because of the curve of the coastline, South Carolina beaches are closer to Asheville than North Carolina’s. Folly Beach and Isle of Palms are around a four-hour drive from Asheville, essentially a straight shot down I-26 East. Hilton Head Island is 4.5 hours away, and Myrtle Beach is just under five.

Asheville North Carolina mapHow far is Asheville from major Southern cities?

Just because you’re in a small town doesn’t mean you can’t easily get your big-city fix. Charlotte, North Carolina’s largest city and the second-largest city in the Southeast (behind Jacksonville, Fla.), is just over two hours (130 miles) away from Asheville. The city of Atlanta (pop. 486,000) is a 3.5-hour drive, which makes Georgia’s capital the perfect weekend destination. For a little Lowcountry charm, head to Charleston, S.C., just four hours away. North Carolina’s Research Triangle – Raleigh, Chapel Hill and Durham – is about four hours away as well.

If Asheville – and its proximity to attractive destinations – sounds appealing to you, and you’d like to explore real estate options, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Bank on a Feast at Asheville's Many Riverfront Restaurants and Breweries

Asheville Riverside Bars and Restaurants

One of the many perks of living in Asheville is the city’s access to the French Broad River. The third-oldest river on Earth, the French Broad slices through the center of Asheville, offering plenty of opportunity for fun on, and along, the famed waterway – including an abundance of riverfront dining and drink venues. Visit one of these spots to take in some tastiness as you absorb the relaxing riverside atmosphere.

Zillicoah Beer Company

Zillicoah, located in Woodfin on the eastern bank of the French Broad River, specializes in open-fermented farmhouse ales and lagers. The brewery’s open-air tasting room rotates up to 12 taps, including in-house beers and guest taps. Zillicoah’s partnership with Taqueria Muñoz means you can savor tacos, tortas and tamales along with the river views. 870 Riverside Drive.

Asheville Riverside DiningWhite Duck Taco

This restaurant’s flagship recently moved a block from its original location to the east bank of the French Broad River, with ample parking, indoor and outdoor seating, and pet-friendly waterfront access. Enjoy such fare as Banh Mi tofu, Thai peanut chicken, or mushroom, potato and romesco sauce tacos, as well as sides like green chile black beans and watermelon with mint. 388 Riverside Drive.

High Five Coffee

This outpost of High Five offers a place to enjoy your coffee overlooking the water, and has a take-out spot if you’re paddling down the river. High Five offers classically prepared espresso drinks as well as house-made syrups for creative concoctions, and a variety of brewing methods for the cup, as well as whole beans. The café serves both savory and sweet, locally prepared fare, as well as several local beers on tap. 2000 Riverside Drive, in the Mill at Riverside

Salvage Station

This riverfront bar, restaurant, concert hall, and special events venue features a relaxed outdoor setting in the River Arts District along the French Broad River.

The restaurant boasts eclectic Southern and Appalachian-inspired choices of in-house smoked meats, sandwiches, and lighter fare. Full bar, vegan/vegetarian options, late-night menu, live music almost nightly, and a family-friendly atmosphere make Salvage Station a year-round favorite. Large sweeping open areas of grass for family outings and multiple viewpoints from the river’s waterfront location provide a unique opportunity to combine music, food and fun. 466 Riverside Drive

Asheville Food and Drinks by the RiverSmoky Park Supper Club

The largest shipping container restaurant in the U.S., Smoky Park Supper Club is situated on the French Broad River on close to 2 acres of land in the River Arts District. The restaurant features seasonal, wood-fired farm-to-table fare, craft beer, cocktails and live music. Arrive by bike, boat or car for riverside dining outdoors on the lawn or deck, or inside the creatively constructed eatery. 350 Riverside Drive.

New Belgium Brewing

Nestled along the French Broad River, New Belgium features a 5,100-square-foot tasting room, as well as a massive outdoor space comprising a large lawn perfect for picnic and play, a fire pit, plenty of picnic benches and high-top seating on a large deck, and Adirondack chairs facing the river with a view of the River Arts District and Chicken Hill neighborhood. A rotating roster of food trucks, live outdoor music in warmer weather, and the array of beers New Belgium is famed for mean you can make a day of it with family and friends. Extremely kid- and dog-friendly (although dogs are not allowed inside the tasting room), New Belgium is also an ideal stop after a bike ride along the greenway. 21 Craven Street.

HomeGrown West

Enjoy locally sourced and updated American cuisine across from the French Broad River Greenway in West Asheville, near Carrier Park. Favorites include such dishes as buttermilk fried chicken and catfish po’boys, as well as sides like sautéed sesame greens and grit cakes. Dine at outdoor picnic tables behind the restaurant, or get your food to go and amble across the street to the park for a riverside picnic. 219 Amboy Road.

For information about Real Estate in Asheville, contact Mosaic Realty owner Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him anytime at 828-337-8190

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