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IN ASHEVILLE, BEAUTY BLOOMS WHEN YOU LANDSCAPE WITH NATIVE PLANTS

Echinacea

For most homeowners, curb appeal begins with beautiful landscaping. But just as important is the preservation of the natural ecosystem around us. With the use of native plant species in yards and gardens, homeowners can integrate the two goals, to great success.

NATIVE PLANT KNOW-HOW

Shasta DaisyNative species of plants occur naturally, without human introduction or intervention. Over time, they have built up physical and biological characteristics specific to regional elements – things like climate, soil type, moisture, and other local plants, animals and insects. They are hardy, environmentally friendly, and help to restore regional landscapes that may be compromised in rapidly developing areas. In short, they are perfectly adapted to their home.

When landscaping with native plants, the best research is simply looking around to get an idea of what grows near your home naturally and beautifully. In the Asheville area, it’s easy to maximize your success by matching the right plants with the right site conditions. To do this, assess the type of light and amount of moisture your planting site receives throughout the day, as well as throughout each growing season. The direction your garden faces, the amount of horizontal and vertical working space you have, and your altitude also figure prominently in native landscaping success. Having your soil pH tested is helpful, and will indicate whether the soil needs to be amended.

A RANGE OF CHOICES FOR LANDSCAPING WITH NATIVES

Butterfly bushFrom wispy wildflowers to low-growing groundcovers, native options in the Asheville area are diverse enough to suit any weekend landscaper’s tastes.

A lot of native planting depends on your landscaping goals:

·      Looking to provide a lush wildlife habitat? Start by creating layers: Plant low-growing plants and shrubs under taller ones, and create an environment where birds can nest and feed.

·      For a punch of color that attracts an array of pollinators, nothing beats wildflowers. Popular in the Asheville area and surrounding region, and targeted to specific seasons, are eastern bluestar, butterfly weed and cardinal flower.

·      For a natural way to stem erosion and minimize maintenance, groundcovers are the way to go. Some popular Western N.C. natives include the multi-season showstopper partridgeberry (white flowers in the spring, red berries in the fall); and green and gold, perfect for populating a rock garden.

·      Ferns and tall grasses provide the ideal habitat for a range of songbirds, butterflies and small animals. Shade garden favorites include cinnamon and Christmas ferns. Grasses are a low-maintenance option, with cloud-like switchgrass and year-round little bluestem popular picks.

AzaleaAsheville is replete with local nurseries well-versed in all aspects of native landscaping. In addition, there are local educational resources galore to get you started on your way to an ecosystem-supporting yard. For more information and guidance on regional native landscaping, visit the following:

Asheville Botanical Gardens

N.C. State University’s “Urban Landscaping With Native Plants” 

N.C. Native Plant Society 

Bee City USA 

And if you’re looking for the perfect house to go with that native-populated yard, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

Asheville City Schools Foundation to Host Celebration of Champions

Asheville City Schools Celebration

Asheville boasts many exceptional leaders who work to champion children in the community by addressing and enhancing equity in the city’s public schools. On Saturday, May 6, the Asheville City Schools Foundation will honor a group of these community leaders, parents and organizations at its annual Celebration of Champions.

The 2017 Celebration of Champions event will feature honorees’ stories and celebrate the impact they are making on the students and teachers of Asheville City Schools. Additionally, a group of Parent Champions, one from each of the nine Asheville City Schools, will also be honored, reflecting the diversity, assets and support parents can provide.

MAKING ASHEVILLE SCHOOLS STRONGER

Mosaic Realty Asheville Public SchoolsFounded in 1988, ACSF champions strong public schools in Asheville through advocacy, grant-making, after-school programming and parent and community engagement. Since 2000, it has provided over $800,000 to projects that directly support the students and teachers in city schools and over $1 million to students through scholarships. Celebration of Champions is ACSF’s signature event to raise funds for key programs including: professional development opportunities for teachers, IRL (In Real Life) after-school program, TAPAS (Teaching Artists Presenting in Asheville Schools), and the Equity Fund.

The Celebration of Champions 2017 honorees are:

Lifetime Achievement Champion Alfred Whitesides, who has fought for decades to ensure educational opportunity for the children of Asheville through its city schools and for the young people of North Carolina through the state university system;

Asheville Supports TeachersCommunity Champion Asheville Writers in the Schools and Community, formed by Janet Hurley and Tamiko Ambrose Murray along with Meggen Lyon and Asheville City Schools Foundation to provide innovative arts and creative writing opportunities to children, teens and families in Asheville’s schools and communities;

Individual Champion Sarah Reincke of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, who coordinates OLLI’s Civic Engagement Committee, spreading the joy of volunteering to the more than 40 OLLI members she helps match with city school placements;

Parent Champions in ACS Luz Velazquez from Asheville City Preschool; Pat Hall from Claxton Elementary; Angelica Wind from Hall Fletcher Elementary; Joan Pinegar from Isaac Dickson Elementary; Gene Peyroux from Ira B. Jones Elementary; Allison Reece from Vance Elementary; Jessica Merchant from Asheville Middle; Alec Fehl from SILSA; and Nancy Hutchins from Asheville High.

MOSAIC REALTY’S INVALUABLE SUPPORT

ACSF Celebration of ChampionsAmong the premier sponsors of the Celebration of Champions 2017 is Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty. A longtime advocate for the health and vitality of the local community as a whole, and Asheville City’s public schools in particular, Mosaic has sponsored ACSF and the Celebration of Champions for four years. Mosaic’s sponsorship attests to the conviction that strong schools start with strong community support.

Celebration of Champions 2017 takes place May 6 at Crowne Plaza Expo Center (1 Resort Drive, Asheville). Buy tickets here. Ticket holders will enjoy appetizers and a cash bar while participating in a silent auction, followed by a seated dinner and program including short films honoring the 2017 Champions.

For more information about our area or about real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Asheville Company is First Carbon Neutral Real Estate Firm in NC

Mosaic Realty Partners with WNCGBC in a Local Solution to Global Pollution

Mosaic Realty AshevilleAsheville, NC: Local Real Estate firm Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty is now officially the first real estate agency in North Carolina to obtain the status of carbon neutral. Longtime supporters of Western North Carolina Building Council (WNCGBC), Mosaic Realty has recently strengthened their partnership by participating in Appalachian Offsets, a program of WNCGBC. By calculating the company’s net carbon output and offsetting it by paying into local green energy projects, they ensure that they are proactively taking steps to address climate change.

According to Dictionary.com, carbon neutrality is having achieved a state in which the net amount of carbon dioxide is reduced to zero because it is balanced by action to reduce or offset these emissions.  In order to participate in Appalachian Offsets, all 21 Mosaic agents have committed to paying a yearly sum reflective of their part of carbon emissions for the company. The funds collected benefit a local nonprofit, school or affordable-housing provider needing an energy-efficiency upgrade.

Appalachian Offsets AshevilleSam Ruark-Eastes, Executive Director of the WNCGBC, explains, “Appalachian Offsets is the bridge that matches companies and individuals looking to offset their emissions with organizations who need support cutting energy cost and upgrading their facilities.” Mike Figura, owner of Mosaic Realty, sees the value of this service to his business. “Mosaic Realty operates on a triple bottom line principle of People, Planet and Profit. We measure our success based on those three categories. Climate change is one of the greatest threats to our environment and species, and Appalachian Offsets offers us a way to take action on a local level to help make a positive impact”, states Figura.

Asheville Appalachian OffsetsBut the partnership between Mosaic and WNCGBC does not stop here. In order to help Asheville  become a carbon neutral community, Mosaic realtors working with buyers connect their clients to WNCGBC’s Green Gauge program. Green Gauge is an innovative home assessment tool that helps residents save money, reduce energy usage and live in homes that are healthier for themselves and the environment. Connecting new residents to some of Asheville’s invaluable resources and programs is a great entrance into this environmentally aware community.

About Mosaic Realty: Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty is a boutique real estate firm made up of 21 professional, full-time brokers who live in Asheville. We specialize in green, historic and in-town properties. Commitment to supporting our local and global community has been at the heart of this downtown Asheville real estate firm since its formation in 2010. In 2016, Mosaic donated over $77,000 to 48 non-profits, including the WNCGBC.

For more information about living in Asheville, contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call him anytime at 828-337-8190.

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Discover Green Built NC Homes in Asheville

Green Home AshevilleGreen-built homes are transforming the residential market and people’s lives everywhere – a fact that is especially true in the Asheville area.

Green homes are built to be healthier and safer by providing cleaner indoor air. They use less energy and water, leading to monthly savings on utilities. This all means the average upfront costs of building green are quickly recouped, as a homeowner will save money for the duration of the home’s lifespan.

Additionally, green-home owners in Asheville and around the country experience increased market value, heralding a higher resale value when the time comes. They also enjoy state and federal tax credits for their home’s renewable energy use and energy-efficiency.

THE CHARACTERISTICS OF A GREEN HOME

Green Homes Save EnergyThe green-built movement in Asheville has the added bonus of support from the Green Built NC Program, a voluntary, statewide green-building program encompassing all aspects of environmental design and construction including:

  • Healthy Site/Landscape: erosion control and preservation of existing trees
  • Water Efficiency: use of high-efficiency irrigation and plumbing fixtures to reduce water bills
  • Building Envelope: use of high-efficiency windows and insulation to reduce energy bills
  • Heating/Cooling Systems: use of high-efficiency equipment and sealed air ducts to increase comfort
  • Appliances/Lighting: use of Energy Star appliances and lighting to reduce utility bills
  • Healthy Indoor Air Quality: use of non-toxic finishes and methods to minimize moisture
  • Materials: use of durable local and recycled content materials for minimal maintenance

 

Tools for Finding a Green Home in Asheville

Green homes are a specialization of Mosaic Realty. So much so that we designed our website with quick search features to locate all green homes on the market in Asheville.  Additionally, we have a quick search for JAG Construction homes, a leader of green built homes in the Asheville area.

Tools for Assessing the Energy Usage of a Home in Asheville

Green Homes Save MoneyA great service available to Asheville homeowners, or those in the market for an Asheville home, is Green Gauge , an innovative home assessment tool to help residents across North Carolina save money, reduce energy usage and live in homes that are healthier for themselves and the environment. Created by the WNC Green Building Council, this program is the first of its kind in the state.

Green Gauge uses a variety of criteria such as energy and water usage, building material sustainability, indoor air quality, site walkability, and landscape ecology in order to determine the green rating of a home. This rating is a perfect tool for buyers looking to compare homes for energy and water efficiency, and can help them understand the true price of home ownership.

The energy efficiency portion of a Green Gauge Assessment is completed using the U.S. Department of Energy's Home Energy Score (HES). HES uses a systematic approach to provide a reliable, scientifically based analysis of a home’s energy characteristics and overall energy efficiency, which is rated on a scale of 1-10. As of this writing, more 42,000 HES assessments have been completed so far across the country, according to the WNC Green Building Council.

For those interested in green-home ownership, aligning with a real estate agent well-versed in the green-built market is key. Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty’s agents can guide you through the intricacies and supply you with all of the information you need to go green.

To learn more about green homes in the Asheville area, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Spotlight on Asheville Neighborhoods: Five Points and UNC-Asheville

UNC Asheville Campus

In a triangle tucked between the Merrimon and Broadway Avenue corridors, just north of downtown Asheville, is the neighborhood known collectively as Five Points and UNC-Asheville. Lining the cluster of prime residential homes that makes up Five Points are an array of businesses – groceries, spas, coffee shops, bed and breakfast inns – all easily accessible by foot. The Five Points and UNC-Asheville area features a range of 1920s and ’30s bungalows mixed with a growing number of modern-style residences, making a stroll through the streets a feast for the eyes.

Five Points Neighborhood AshevilleBordering the north end of Five Points is the University of North Carolina at Asheville (the only dedicated liberal arts institution in the UNC system and home to an array of events open to the public), the regionally renowned North Asheville Tailgate Market, and the beautiful Botanical Gardens at Asheville. The USDA Forest Service Southern Research Station Headquarters is also located in the neighborhood.

A Walkable Asheville Neighborhood

High Five Coffee Shop AshevilleResidents of Five Points have the distinct privilege of being within walking distance of a collection of popular specialty grocery stores – Greenlife (Whole Foods), Trader Joe’s and Harris Teeter – along with favorite meeting spots Five Points Restaurant and High Five Coffee. Try the Diablo at High Coffee, pictured at left. At the tip of the triangle sits the Moog Music Factory, where the world-famous Moog Music synthesizers and other electronic musical instruments are designed and handcrafted, and where visitors can play the gear, or take a free factory tour to see employees at work building some of the most innovative instruments in the world. This walkable neighborhood boasts sidewalks lining many streets.

UNC-Asheville: An Asheville Community Gem

UNC-Asheville offers amazing resources not only for its students, but for the general public as well. The university sponsors a wide range of cultural and academic events, concerts, lectures, movie screenings and the like, both on campus and off, year-round. In addition, programs like the Family Business Forum and the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute are specifically designed to educate and support the Asheville community.

Botanical Gardens of Asheville and Tailgate Market

Botanical Gardens AshevilleBordering the UNCA campus is the Botanical Gardens of Asheville, a 10-acre independent, non-profit botanical gardens dedicated to the study and promotion of the native plants and habitats of the Southern Appalachians. Admission is free, and the gardens boast trails lined with meandering creeks and stunning scenery perfect for spending a sunny afternoon.

The North Asheville Tailgate Market (whose 2017 season runs from April 1-Nov. 18) sets up shop on the UNCA campus every Saturday from 8 a.m. til noon. Since 1980, the market has provided visitors with a full range of local, sustainably produced produce, meats, eggs, cheeses, breads, plants, prepared foods and crafts. With more than 40 vendors and over 40,000 annual customers, the market’s energetic and warm environment exemplifies the celebrated diversity of Asheville’s community.

For a personally guided tour of the Five Points and UNCA area, or for more information on real estate here or anywhere in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

Your Ultimate Guide to Asheville and Buncombe County Schools

STEM School Asheville

For families with school-aged children, proximity to strong schools is often a major factor in determining the neighborhood in which to live. Fortunately, in Asheville, we have a wide and diverse selection of fantastic public, private and charter schools. This guide, organized by age of children, provides an overview of the area’s educational institutions.

Public Elementary Schools in the Asheville Buncombe Area

Vance Elementary School AshevilleThe Asheville/ Buncombe area is unique in that it operates separate city and county school districts.  

Asheville City Schools system serves the most centrally-located neighborhoods. Their elementary school model is based on a magnet system where families can select their top 3 choices from the 5 differently-themed magnet schools. If there is more demand than availability, a lottery is used for placement. The city school system has a strong partnership with the Asheville City Schools Foundation.

Buncombe County School system operates neighborhood-based elementary schools where children attend the school based upon the district in which they live. Students in South Asheville feed into the TC Roberson School district. East Asheville and Fairview students attend A.C. Reynolds district elementary schools. Swannanoa and Black Mountain students attend Owen district schools. West Asheville students attend Enka or Erwin districts. North Asheville and Weaverville students attend North Buncombe School District.  

We recommend that you check the public school district indicated under the Location section of property listings.

Public Middle Schools in the Asheville Buncombe Area

Bike Walk to School AshevilleAsheville Middle School has been the long-standing public middle school for students within the Asheville City Schools district.  New in the 2017-2018 school year is a STEAM-focused alternative middle school option called the Montford North Star Academy.  Both of these middle schools have excellent community partnerships in place.

Each of the separate Buncombe County school districts has one middle school, and some have intermediate schools that also serve their district's middle school age children.

Public High Schools in the Asheville Buncombe Area

Asheville High SchoolAsheville High School is the sole high school within the Asheville City Schools district. It is located on a gorgeous historic campus near Mission Hospital.  SILSA operates as a school within a school and has a focus on inquiry and life sciences.  These schools have a long tradition of academic excellence and partner with Asheville Buncombe Technical Community College on college credit coursework.

Each of the separate Buncombe County school districts has one high school to serve young adults in that district. Additionally, there is the Martin L. Nesbitt, Jr. Discovery Academy - a STEM school with a focus on college and career readiness.

 

Charter Schools in the Asheville Buncombe Area

Students Outdoor School AshevilleThere are a handful of long-standing charter schools in Buncombe County.  Evergreen Community Charter School is in East Asheville and utilizes an Outward Bound expeditionary learning model to teach Kindergarten through eighth grade students. A newer charter school in West Buncombe, Franklin School of Innovation, offers the same model to fifth through twelfth grade students.

Francine Delany New School for Children, in the heart of West Asheville, serves children Kindergarten through eighth grade with a focus on social justice. ArtSpace Charter school in Swannanoa offers an arts-integrated curriculum to 400 elementary and middle school students.

Private Schools in the Asheville Buncombe Area

Asheville SchoolRainbow Community School is a private, independent alternative education program for preschool through middle aged children. Located in West Asheville, if focuses on whole child education through seven domains.

Carolina Day School is a private school that serves children in grades Kindergarten through 12th grade.  It is located in south Asheville near Biltmore Forest and is focused on college preparation.

Asheville School is a nationally renowned day and boarding school serving college-bound high school students with a rigorous curriculum. It is located on a gorgeous historic campus in West Asheville.

Several private single-sex middle schools are available in our area. For girls, there is the new French Broad River Academy for Girls and Hanger Hall.  For boys, there is the adventurous French Broad River Academy for Boys.

Emmanuel Lutheran, Asheville Catholic School, Christ School and Asheville Christian Academy are all religious schools in this area serving a wide range of ages.

Post Secondary Schools in the Asheville Buncombe Area

UNC AshevilleAsheville Buncombe Technical Community College, located near downtown Asheville, serves our county for career and technical readiness courses.  

Part of the state university system, University of North Carolina at Asheville offers undergraduate and limited graduate level coursework and is the only dedicated liberal arts institution in the system.

Warren Wilson College is a private four year liberal arts college located in the beautiful Swannanoa River Valley.  It is known for its strong service learning components, creative writing and environmental studies programs.

Montreat College, in the stunning Montreat community just outside of Black Mountain, is a private Christian liberal arts college.  Mars Hill University, 15 miles north of Asheville in Marshall also offers a liberal arts course of study in a private setting.

Pairing a school with a neighborhood can be a difficult balance. We would love to help you make that choice by guiding you on our Neighborhood Familiarization Tour.

Please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Your Guide to the Past, Present and Future of Greenways in Asheville

Bikes ParkFor many people, the image of friends, couples, children and retirees gathering together at a city’s parks, and arriving there in multifaceted ways, brings about a feeling of community well-being.  In an increasingly busy and crowded world, we often make choices about our homes based upon access and proximity to public parks and alternative transportation.  

Asheville, North Carolina is no exception to this. The housing market within the city of Asheville is booming, and homes with proximity to greenways are not staying on the market for long.  Check out the history of Asheville’s greenways, the current state, and where the greenways are headed here.

The History of Greenways in Asheville

In the three decades prior to 2015, Asheville claimed only 5 miles of greenway with little connectivity between them.  This allowed for isolated pockets of greenway enjoyment but major obstacles to promoting alternative and green methods of transportation.  Greenways that are long-standing in Asheville include the French Broad River Park Greenway and Reed Creek Greenway near UNCA and the city center.

The Current State of Greenways in Asheville

Asheville ParkThe City of Asheville helps to maintain 4 greenways currently, the largest being the French Broad River Greenway at 2.83 miles in length.  It is mostly an 8 foot wide asphalt path that meanders from the Hominy Creek trailhead, through Carrier Park, along Amboy Road and to the French Broad River Park and dog park.  It provides connectivity for Asheville’s largest and most frequented park system.

Glen’s Creek Greenway connects Weaver Park in North Asheville to UNCA and and the Botanical Gardens; it is nearly a mile in length. Nearby, Reed Creek Greenway (.7 miles long) connects the historic Montford neighborhood to the UNCA area and Glen Creek Greenway. Finally, the Riverbend Park Greenway (nearly .5 miles long) hugs the Swannanoa River in east Asheville.

The Future of Greenways in Asheville

Asheville GreenwayThe master plan for greenways in Asheville has a goal of creating a 15 mile system composed of 12 interconnected corridors.  This River to Ridge Greenway and Trail network would encircle downtown Asheville.  It would reach into the River Arts District, French Broad River Greenways, Southslope Greenway Connector, Beaucatcher Greenway and Urban Trail.  

The use of multi-paths for both transportation and recreation has consistently ranked high on the public’s list of infrastructure projects that it values. Additionally, governments outside of the city of Asheville are beginning to catch the greenway bug.  Both the town of Woodfin and Buncombe County governments are advocating for connectivity with the Asheville greenway system.

A major goal of the project is to connect people to some of the beautiful assets of our area: the mountains and the rivers.

For more information on our area or real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Sources: Asheville Citizen Times article, February 2017

The City of Asheville

 

 

3 Reasons to Spring into Action and List Your House Now

Spring Home Sales

If you have been considering selling your home in the near future, there are many benefits to acting now to list this spring.  Discover 3 reasons here.

1.  Great Marketing Photos Sell Homes

Marketing Photos Sell HomesRemember that old adage that a picture is worth a thousand words?  Home shoppers make initial decisions on whether to schedule an appointment to see a home based largely on the visual presentation of the home in marketing photos and video.

Undoubtedly, homes show better in the warmer months.  Trees and grass are a vibrant green, flowers splash the landscape with color and blue skies are more frequent. Additionally, outdoor living spaces are more easily highlighted in the professional photography.

2.  Timing Your Listing to Get the Most Potential Buyers

Downtown AshevilleBy early March, home shoppers with families are starting to think ahead to being settled before the fall school season begins, and they know that the lengthy process requires getting a jump start on the process.  Inevitably, with the warm weather, they begin to emerge onto the home hunting scene.  The season has a back end time limit as well.  When the holiday season begins in November, buyers tend to turn their attention away from house hunting to the hustle and bustle of the holiday season.

Another reason to consider putting your home on the market in the spring is to take advantage of the busy tourist season.  People often take vacations in the warmer months and may travel to your location.  Tourists frequently fall in love with their vacation destination and may reach out to real estate agents to begin the home search process while in town.

3.  Get a Higher Selling Price

InvestmentBecause the real estate world is very seasonal in terms of when people are out searching for properties, homes that sell in the warm weather months often fetch higher prices than homes that sell in the cooler months.  This may seem counter-intuitive, since more homes hit the market in warmer months and there should be more supply. However, with the influx of buyers in spring and summer, the supply of homes on the market actually gets tighter, driving prices up.

Who doesn’t love the prospect of getting more return on investment for their home?  So, don't wait to list, contact us today!

For more information on selling or buying real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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A Look Inside the Downtown Asheville Condo Life

Downtown Asheville Condo

The Downtown Asheville Lifestyle

Asheville Condo BalconyLiving in downtown Asheville is an exciting and convenient way of life, and given the growing number of refurbished and new condo buildings, it is an increasingly popular lifestyle as well. With dozens of incredible restaurants, bars, art galleries and entertainment merely steps away, there is never a dull moment.

Many of the amenities provided by these downtown condominiums are designed to accommodate a walkable lifestyle with easy access to all that you would need.  Features such as in-house gyms, storage closets, common areas and on-site parking help to make that lifestyle possible.

Newer Downtown Asheville Condos

Downtown Asheville CondoA number of new condominium buildings have cropped up in downtown Asheville in recent years, with many of them adopting a mixed-use model.  For example, 12 South Lexington and Lexington Station have commercial spaces on the ground level and multiple housing units in varying sizes above.

A hallmark of many of the newer condos is the use of balconies and terraces in most units. The luxury condos at both 60 North Market and 21 Battery Park feature terraces with sweeping views of the Blue Ridge Mountains.  They also both feature rooftop club houses for entertaining guests.

Refurbished Downtown Asheville Condos

Downtown Asheville CondoDowntown Asheville is known for its well-preserved historic district.  Many small independent businesses have moved into the ground floor units of these stunning buildings while the upper floors have turned into mixed use developments with offices as well as residences.

Buildings as old as the 1891 Oxford Place Condos have been refurbished and modernized, providing residences with tons of character and historic charm.  The Broadway Arts Building condos and Sawyer Motor Building Condos feature original hardwood floors and exposed brick walls alongside modern conveniences such as updated electric, plumbing and windows.

Many of these vintage condos have been carefully renovated to provide many of the community features desirable in newer condos as well. For example, 37 Hiawassee and the Kress Building condos have incorporated rooftop terraces for residents to take in the city views, and Ardmion Park, once known as the Sky Club, provides its residents with a community swimming pool and gardens overlooking the city.

For more information on real estate or living in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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4 Benefits of Buying a Historic Home in Asheville

Historic Home Kenilworth Asheville

Part of the wide appeal of Asheville is its aesthetic.  Though it is a small city, nestled among the ancient Blue Ridge Mountains, it draws in flocks of tourists.  Many of these tourists eventually make their way into the charming historic neighborhoods of Asheville and are drawn in by the architectural beauty of these well-preserved homes. This is evidenced by the quickly growing population and popularity of Asheville.

The Craftsmanship and Strength of Historic Homes is Unmatched

Unique Coffered Ceiling DesignOlder homes, particularly those that were built before World War 1, are typically built of much higher quality materials than newer homes.  You will often find rare hardwoods such as heart pine and wood from old-growth forests.  Rare gems such as copper adornments and opalescent glass exemplify the handmade nature of these buildings.

America is currently undergoing a type of downtown revival.  Residents and tourists alike are enjoying the cultural hub provided by historic centers.  Start-up businesses such as bookstores and restaurants are thriving in these historic locations.  Historic neighborhoods close to these city centers are increasingly appealing for their vibrancy and walkability.

Possible Tax Incentives

As of January of 2016, the North Carolina legislature has put into effect a historic rehabilitation tax credit program.  This program provides a great incentive to taxpayers who rehabilitate their homes or income-producing properties.  These incentives for improving historic structures are an important tool for historic preservation in North Carolina.  Additionally, a federal tax credit for the rehabilitation of historic homes consists of a 20% credit for qualifying income-producing historic properties that have been rehabilitated.

Adaptive Reuse is Environmentally Friendly

Far superior to demolition, the concept of adaptive reuse encourages people to preserve the structural assets in place.  This saves a lot of energy that goes into the manufacture, transportation and assembly of new building materials.  Historical buildings’ energy efficiency can always be improved upon, and the latest building technologies are making that increasingly easy.

You Are Preserving History

Ideal Yard for Pets and PlayAsheville is a place of deep-rooted history.  A small group of big-dreaming activists played a large role in helping to stop the demolition of many of downtown Asheville’s historic buildings to put in a strip mall.  Fortunately, they were able to stop the destruction, and preservationists stepped in with a Public Works program that encouraged business owners to preserve the historic buildings and create businesses within their walls.  Today, Asheville has a vibrant downtown and many of the businesses are housed in architecturally astounding structures.

Similarly, many devoted homeowners have moved into the many historic neighborhoods around Asheville, and with a little TLC, have preserved these stately homes.  Examples of this can bee seen in the Victorian and Queen Anne homes in Montford, pebble dash cottages in Biltmore Village, charming bungalows in West Asheville and Colonial Revival and Tudor homes of Grove Park, among many others.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Sources and Further Reading: National Trust for Historic Preservation 

Preservation North Carolina