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Your Guide to the Past, Present and Future of Greenways in Asheville

Bikes ParkFor many people, the image of friends, couples, children and retirees gathering together at a city’s parks, and arriving there in multifaceted ways, brings about a feeling of community well-being.  In an increasingly busy and crowded world, we often make choices about our homes based upon access and proximity to public parks and alternative transportation.  

Asheville, North Carolina is no exception to this. The housing market within the city of Asheville is booming, and homes with proximity to greenways are not staying on the market for long.  Check out the history of Asheville’s greenways, the current state, and where the greenways are headed here.

The History of Greenways in Asheville

In the three decades prior to 2015, Asheville claimed only 5 miles of greenway with little connectivity between them.  This allowed for isolated pockets of greenway enjoyment but major obstacles to promoting alternative and green methods of transportation.  Greenways that are long-standing in Asheville include the French Broad River Park Greenway and Reed Creek Greenway near UNCA and the city center.

The Current State of Greenways in Asheville

Asheville ParkThe City of Asheville helps to maintain 4 greenways currently, the largest being the French Broad River Greenway at 2.83 miles in length.  It is mostly an 8 foot wide asphalt path that meanders from the Hominy Creek trailhead, through Carrier Park, along Amboy Road and to the French Broad River Park and dog park.  It provides connectivity for Asheville’s largest and most frequented park system.

Glen’s Creek Greenway connects Weaver Park in North Asheville to UNCA and and the Botanical Gardens; it is nearly a mile in length. Nearby, Reed Creek Greenway (.7 miles long) connects the historic Montford neighborhood to the UNCA area and Glen Creek Greenway. Finally, the Riverbend Park Greenway (nearly .5 miles long) hugs the Swannanoa River in east Asheville.

The Future of Greenways in Asheville

Asheville GreenwayThe master plan for greenways in Asheville has a goal of creating a 15 mile system composed of 12 interconnected corridors.  This River to Ridge Greenway and Trail network would encircle downtown Asheville.  It would reach into the River Arts District, French Broad River Greenways, Southslope Greenway Connector, Beaucatcher Greenway and Urban Trail.  

The use of multi-paths for both transportation and recreation has consistently ranked high on the public’s list of infrastructure projects that it values. Additionally, governments outside of the city of Asheville are beginning to catch the greenway bug.  Both the town of Woodfin and Buncombe County governments are advocating for connectivity with the Asheville greenway system.

A major goal of the project is to connect people to some of the beautiful assets of our area: the mountains and the rivers.

For more information on our area or real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Sources: Asheville Citizen Times article, February 2017

The City of Asheville

 

 

3 Reasons to Spring into Action and List Your House Now

Spring Home Sales

If you have been considering selling your home in the near future, there are many benefits to acting now to list this spring.  Discover 3 reasons here.

1.  Great Marketing Photos Sell Homes

Marketing Photos Sell HomesRemember that old adage that a picture is worth a thousand words?  Home shoppers make initial decisions on whether to schedule an appointment to see a home based largely on the visual presentation of the home in marketing photos and video.

Undoubtedly, homes show better in the warmer months.  Trees and grass are a vibrant green, flowers splash the landscape with color and blue skies are more frequent. Additionally, outdoor living spaces are more easily highlighted in the professional photography.

2.  Timing Your Listing to Get the Most Potential Buyers

Downtown AshevilleBy early March, home shoppers with families are starting to think ahead to being settled before the fall school season begins, and they know that the lengthy process requires getting a jump start on the process.  Inevitably, with the warm weather, they begin to emerge onto the home hunting scene.  The season has a back end time limit as well.  When the holiday season begins in November, buyers tend to turn their attention away from house hunting to the hustle and bustle of the holiday season.

Another reason to consider putting your home on the market in the spring is to take advantage of the busy tourist season.  People often take vacations in the warmer months and may travel to your location.  Tourists frequently fall in love with their vacation destination and may reach out to real estate agents to begin the home search process while in town.

3.  Get a Higher Selling Price

InvestmentBecause the real estate world is very seasonal in terms of when people are out searching for properties, homes that sell in the warm weather months often fetch higher prices than homes that sell in the cooler months.  This may seem counter-intuitive, since more homes hit the market in warmer months and there should be more supply. However, with the influx of buyers in spring and summer, the supply of homes on the market actually gets tighter, driving prices up.

Who doesn’t love the prospect of getting more return on investment for their home?  So, don't wait to list, contact us today!

For more information on selling or buying real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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A Look Inside the Downtown Asheville Condo Life

Downtown Asheville Condo

The Downtown Asheville Lifestyle

Asheville Condo BalconyLiving in downtown Asheville is an exciting and convenient way of life, and given the growing number of refurbished and new condo buildings, it is an increasingly popular lifestyle as well. With dozens of incredible restaurants, bars, art galleries and entertainment merely steps away, there is never a dull moment.

Many of the amenities provided by these downtown condominiums are designed to accommodate a walkable lifestyle with easy access to all that you would need.  Features such as in-house gyms, storage closets, common areas and on-site parking help to make that lifestyle possible.

Newer Downtown Asheville Condos

Downtown Asheville CondoA number of new condominium buildings have cropped up in downtown Asheville in recent years, with many of them adopting a mixed-use model.  For example, 12 South Lexington and Lexington Station have commercial spaces on the ground level and multiple housing units in varying sizes above.

A hallmark of many of the newer condos is the use of balconies and terraces in most units. The luxury condos at both 60 North Market and 21 Battery Park feature terraces with sweeping views of the Blue Ridge Mountains.  They also both feature rooftop club houses for entertaining guests.

Refurbished Downtown Asheville Condos

Downtown Asheville CondoDowntown Asheville is known for its well-preserved historic district.  Many small independent businesses have moved into the ground floor units of these stunning buildings while the upper floors have turned into mixed use developments with offices as well as residences.

Buildings as old as the 1891 Oxford Place Condos have been refurbished and modernized, providing residences with tons of character and historic charm.  The Broadway Arts Building condos and Sawyer Motor Building Condos feature original hardwood floors and exposed brick walls alongside modern conveniences such as updated electric, plumbing and windows.

Many of these vintage condos have been carefully renovated to provide many of the community features desirable in newer condos as well. For example, 37 Hiawassee and the Kress Building condos have incorporated rooftop terraces for residents to take in the city views, and Ardmion Park, once known as the Sky Club, provides its residents with a community swimming pool and gardens overlooking the city.

For more information on real estate or living in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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4 Benefits of Buying a Historic Home in Asheville

Historic Home Kenilworth Asheville

Part of the wide appeal of Asheville is its aesthetic.  Though it is a small city, nestled among the ancient Blue Ridge Mountains, it draws in flocks of tourists.  Many of these tourists eventually make their way into the charming historic neighborhoods of Asheville and are drawn in by the architectural beauty of these well-preserved homes. This is evidenced by the quickly growing population and popularity of Asheville.

The Craftsmanship and Strength of Historic Homes is Unmatched

Unique Coffered Ceiling DesignOlder homes, particularly those that were built before World War 1, are typically built of much higher quality materials than newer homes.  You will often find rare hardwoods such as heart pine and wood from old-growth forests.  Rare gems such as copper adornments and opalescent glass exemplify the handmade nature of these buildings.

America is currently undergoing a type of downtown revival.  Residents and tourists alike are enjoying the cultural hub provided by historic centers.  Start-up businesses such as bookstores and restaurants are thriving in these historic locations.  Historic neighborhoods close to these city centers are increasingly appealing for their vibrancy and walkability.

Possible Tax Incentives

As of January of 2016, the North Carolina legislature has put into effect a historic rehabilitation tax credit program.  This program provides a great incentive to taxpayers who rehabilitate their homes or income-producing properties.  These incentives for improving historic structures are an important tool for historic preservation in North Carolina.  Additionally, a federal tax credit for the rehabilitation of historic homes consists of a 20% credit for qualifying income-producing historic properties that have been rehabilitated.

Adaptive Reuse is Environmentally Friendly

Far superior to demolition, the concept of adaptive reuse encourages people to preserve the structural assets in place.  This saves a lot of energy that goes into the manufacture, transportation and assembly of new building materials.  Historical buildings’ energy efficiency can always be improved upon, and the latest building technologies are making that increasingly easy.

You Are Preserving History

Ideal Yard for Pets and PlayAsheville is a place of deep-rooted history.  A small group of big-dreaming activists played a large role in helping to stop the demolition of many of downtown Asheville’s historic buildings to put in a strip mall.  Fortunately, they were able to stop the destruction, and preservationists stepped in with a Public Works program that encouraged business owners to preserve the historic buildings and create businesses within their walls.  Today, Asheville has a vibrant downtown and many of the businesses are housed in architecturally astounding structures.

Similarly, many devoted homeowners have moved into the many historic neighborhoods around Asheville, and with a little TLC, have preserved these stately homes.  Examples of this can bee seen in the Victorian and Queen Anne homes in Montford, pebble dash cottages in Biltmore Village, charming bungalows in West Asheville and Colonial Revival and Tudor homes of Grove Park, among many others.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

Search: View all homes for sale in Asheville

Sources and Further Reading: National Trust for Historic Preservation 

Preservation North Carolina 

5 Advantages to Using a Boutique Real Estate Firm in Asheville

Boutique Asheville

Boutique real estate firms are analogous to a boutique clothing store: you get localized knowledge, great customer service, the teamwork of the whole organization, commitment to community and quality over quantity.  Think Minx Boutique in downtown Asheville versus a department store in the mall.  The experience is unparalleled!

Here we highlight how working with a boutique real estate firm such as Mosaic Realty makes for an efficient and pleasant real estate experience.

Localized Knowledge

AshevilleWhen you decide to buy or sell in a certain area, choosing a real estate firm that specializes in the area in which you are interested is of utmost importance.  Rather than work with a behemoth company that spreads it's agency over a multi-county area, choose a firm with specialized knowledge of the market and neighborhoods in which you are interested.  

Incredible Customer Service

When you walk into a department store, there is not a design specialist there to help you hand-select items that are a great fit for you.  In a boutique company however, the customer service is accessible, tailored, and responsive.  

From the moment that a client calls a boutique real estate firm, the staff and agents are listening to his or her needs.  The result of this listening is to pair you with an agent that will be the best fit for your real estate goals.  But it does not stop there.  From listing your home or touring neighborhoods all the way to the close of the deal, your agent and the staff will keep you top of mind.

Quality Over Quantity

Real EstateBoutique real estate agencies tend to select already successful agents rather than entry level brokers since they have a limited number of openings.  Their level of expertise, efficiency and professionalism is of the highest quality.  The measure of success that many boutique firms is looking for is productive, professional agents and happy customers as opposed to size of the firm.

The Teamwork of the Whole Office

In a large real estate company, there are many automated processes where you get put in the pipeline and passed through many hands. By contrast, your agent at a boutique real estate firm will be there to walk with you every step of the way.  The synergy and collaboration of the small but tightly knit team means that each listed property is given a team approach.

Commitment to Community

Asheville BoutiqueYour community is also the community of the boutique firm.  The agents and business owners live and work in this area, and their business only does well if the health of the community is strong.  They will be committed to fostering a community that is economically vital, welcoming and socially sound.   This often results in strong volunteer and donation programs within these boutique firms.  Supporting a business that gives back is always satisfactory!

For information on how we can help you with real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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4 Benefits of Buying or Building a Green Home in Asheville

New Green Built Energy Star House

If you are at a crossroads in life with home ownership, consider these incredible benefits of buying or building a LEED certified green home rather than opting for a traditionally built home.   LEED, or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is a certification program for green building.  Here we examine some reasons to consider buying or building a LEED certified home.

Green Homes are Healthier and Safer

ERV Indoor Air QualityA major health concern with regard to homes is indoor air quality.  The Environmental Protection Agency has found that indoor air quality is 2-10 times more polluted than outdoor air quality due to things like mold, mildew and off-gassing from furniture and carpet.  LEED certified homes are designed to improve indoor air quality through features that minimize airborne toxins and pollutants through high-efficiency air filters and proper ventilation.  

LEED-certified homes undergo a rigorous process of inspections, performance testing and review of documentations related to green features to make sure that the homeowners are safe.

Green Homes Create Value

LEED certified homes are designed to use 30-60% less energy than a traditionally built home.  With an average energy expenditure of around $2,150 per year, this amounts to significant savings each year, and thousands of dollars in savings if you stay in the home for a number of years.  Additionally, there are state and federal tax credits for energy efficiency and renewable energy.

Importantly, green homes hold their value when you are ready to sell.  They tend to sell more quickly than other homes and yield a higher sales price.

Green Homes Help Our Environment Immensely

Energy SavingsGreen Homes are built with conservation of natural resources in mind.  With the tight envelope of green built homes, indoor air temperatures stay fairly consistent.  The energy that goes into heating or cooling these types of homes is greatly reduced due to high tech insulation, energy-efficient appliances, weather stripping and high quality materials.  Often these homes employ alternative energy sources as well.  Water is conserved through low flow fixtures.  Chemical off-gassing is reduced through low or no -VOC paints, and materials selection is often local.


Green Homes are a Growing Choice in Asheville

The United States Green Building Council states that it is estimated that green single family residences will represent about one third of the housing market and that almost 90% of all new residential construction will include green features.

According to our year-end 2016 market analysis, green homes are an increasingly popular choice in Asheville as well as other major markets.  Inventory of green homes in the city of Asheville was at only 2.88 months, and these homes were returning a median price per square foot of $223.

For more information on green homes and real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

Search: View all Green Homes for Sale in Asheville

Search: View all Homes for Sale in Asheville

Sources and Further Reading: WNC Green Building Council

 

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The Best-Kept-Secret Neighborhood in West Asheville: Malvern Hills

Malvern Hills Neighborhood Asheville

Just west of the desirable historic West Asheville neighborhood lies the quiet community of Malvern Hills.  This hidden gem of Asheville has a rich history and a vibrant community.  Additionally, as a part of West Asheville, it is a highly walkable community.

The History of Malvern Hills Neighborhood in Asheville

Beginning in the 1820s, people voyaged from the surrounding countryside to this area to enjoy the health benefits of the sulphur springs discovered in these hills by Robert Henry.  By the mid 1800s, as word of the healing waters spread, people would travel here to reap the benefits of the healing waters. They would stay in the Hotel Belmont, and later the Sulphur Springs Hotel, both of which stood in the center of what is now the neighborhood until they burned and were ultimately abandoned in 1891.  Remnants of the spring house can still be seen at the bottom of School Road.

The Landscape of Malvern Hills

Malvern Hills ArchitectureMalvern Hills neighborhood, bordered by Bear Creek Road on the east, Wendover Road on the south, and on the north by School Road, has just over 200 houses within its boundaries.  Patton Avenue provides quick access to downtown Asheville and I-40 while the western end of the neighborhood is bordered by Canie Creek.  This small creek winds through a large wooded tract of land where residents frequently spot deer, bear, and wild turkeys.  A strong movement is currently underway to secure a greenway along this creek.

Infrastructure and Architecture of Malvern Hills

Malvern Hills Community ParkMalvern Hills boasts one of the few areas in west Asheville to have sidewalks lining all roads, thus making it a pedestrian-friendly area. There are three community-maintained landscaped islands, one with a rose garden, where residents  congregate during neighborhood gatherings. Mature trees grace the hilly slopes of this area, and you may glimpse mountain views from some of the hilltops.  

The architecture is a pleasant mix of larger, stately 1920s homes, small bungalows, brick tudor cottages, and mid-century ranch houses.  The lots are of a generous size and are well-maintained.

For more information on neighborhoods and real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

Search: View all homes for sale in Asheville

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Further Reading:  A Brief History of Malvern Hills

Further Reading: A neighborhood Profile

 

 

Explore the Serene Swannanoa River Valley in Asheville

Swannanoa River Valley Asheville

To the east of Asheville, stretching out between the mountains of Asheville and Black Mountain, lies the gorgeous Swannanoa River Valley. Through it winds the Swannanoa River, flowing west from its headwaters in Black Mountain and the slopes of Mount Mitchell to eventually become a major tributary of the French Broad River in Biltmore Village.  Though it is just outside the small city of Asheville, this valley has a peaceful, rural feel and a growing hub in downtown Swannanoa.  

History of the Swannanoa River Valley

Warren Wilson CollegeFor nearly 12,000 years, the Swannanoa Valley has been inhabited.  The Cherokee Native Americans hunted along the banks of the river for thousands of years.  By the late 1700s, European settlers began to make permanent settlements.  Subsistence farmers scraped together a difficult mountain lifestyle throughout the next hundred years.  

Sweeping changes came to the valley in 1879 with the arrival of the railroad to Western North Carolina.  Logging and development of major religious retreats such as Montreat changed the landscape of the valley greatly.  In the 1920s, E.W. Grove, developer of the Grove Park Inn, built Lake Eden near Black Mountain which was to have a country club built around it.  He passed away before the project was completed, but it became the site of Black Mountain College in 1940, and many of Grove’s original buildings are still in use today.

Farmland and manufacturing played important roles in this area in the past century, but these are diminishing presences today, and many of the residents in the valley now commute to Asheville for work.

Hiking along the Swannanoa River

Warren Wilson Trails AshevilleWarren Wilson College, located in the heart of the valley, is a nationally renowned liberal arts college with an emphasis on work and service.  Many Warren Wilson graduates have become successful entrepreneurs in the Asheville area.  They also host several wonderful farmer's markets throughout the year.

The college has been kind enough to welcome the public to enjoy some of its many beautiful and well-maintained hiking trails.  They are a short 15 minute drive from Asheville and feature both easy hiking trails with entry points along the river and trails with significant elevation gain.  A map of the trail system may be found here.

On the Western end of the valley, the Blue Ridge Parkway crosses highway 70. The Mountains to Sea Trail runs along the Parkway here, providing another easily accessible hiking experience.  You can also check out the Blue Ridge Parkway Visitors Center and Folk Art Center after your hike.

Activities in the Swannanoa River Valley

Beer Tasting PisgahSwannanoa Valley Museum and History Center is a fantastic resource for Buncombe County history.  It is open seasonally but events continue year round.  The museum is located on West State Street in Black Mountain in a building built in 1921 by famous architect Richard Sharp Smith.  Find history tidbits there and join in their hiking programs with gorgeous vistas and invaluable historical information.

Pisgah Brewing Company is an organic microbrewery located in the heart of the valley.  It has a large outdoor stage and field, perfect for hearing music with children.  Music and beer appreciators bring blankets and chairs for a festival-style listening experience in warm weather.  Enjoy the indoor stage and tasting room in cooler weather.  This venue not only has some of the best microbrews in the region, they also draw nationally touring bands.

Just off of 70, near the old Beacon Mill Village homes of the 1920s, is a downtown area of Swannanoa that is ripe for revitalization.  The Native Kitchen and Social Club are two local businesses that have started to pick up steam in the area and become community hubs.  The Root Bar has become a favorite of locals as well.  With the smattering of mom and pops businesses along highway 70, easy access to I-40, and gorgeous natural surroundings, this area is becoming increasingly popular.

For more information on our community or on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

Search: View all homes for sale in Asheville

Sources and Further Reading: Swannanoa Valley Museum

Comments

  1. Adam Donkus on

    I had not been to Asheville since I was a teenager. It does seem to have a lot going on. I may have to schedule a vacation to Asheville.

    Preparing to Sell Your Home: A Timeline Made Simple

    Staging

    Making a decision to list your home is a big one.  Likely, your house is your largest asset and chock full of memories and life.  Give yourself adequate time to prepare, and keep your patience and sense of humor on hand.  Follow this two month timeline to prepare yourself and your home for the big move!

    Two Months Before Listing Your Home for Sale:

    Painting Interior

    • Survey the condition of your property as a potential buyer would. Notice things that may look poorly maintained or in need of repair and make a list.
    • Begin tackling that list of small repairs such as leaky faucets, drywall that needs patching, and gutters that may need repairing.
    • Consider some small aesthetic upgrades that need doing anyway, are neutral in style, and can provide a good return on investment.
    • If you like to DIY, begin knocking these things off the list or line up hired help for these aesthetic items such as freshening up the paint with neutral colors and updating plumbing or lighting fixtures.

    One Month Before Listing:

     

    • Contact a real estate professional with a proven track record and excellent communication skills.
    • Your agent will give you advice on staging your property for sale, much of which will involve decluttering (see below for staging details).
    • Look at your agent’s comparative market analysis to decide together on a listing price.
    • Begin pulling together any appliance manuals or service records that your future buyer may appreciate as a demonstration of good home maintenance.

    Three Weeks Before Listing:

    Storage Unit

    • Combine your real estate agent’s advice about staging and decluttering your home with your own need to pack up in preparation for the move by starting to collect boxes or storage bins, label them, and place unnecessary items in them for storage
    • Evaluate each item that you have and decide if you will use it in the future. If you will not, fill boxes to go to charities such as Salvation Army and Goodwill.
    • If you do not have a garage or storage shed in which to store these personal items, rent a storage unit.

      Photo â€‹Courtesy of Cable Storage Fife http://cableroadcontainers.co.uk

    Two Weeks Before Listing:

     

    • Continue the process of decluttering, packing and storing your items. You want your home to resemble a vacation rental when you are finished, with personal photos removed from the walls and surfaces cleared.
    • Begin the process of performing or scheduling some deep cleaning items such as getting the windows washed, cobwebs out of corners, and ceiling fans dusted off.
    • Although it is a lower priority than living spaces, do not forget to clean storage areas such as garages and sheds. It is understandable if you have boxed items stored in there, but it should still be clean.

    One Week Before Listing:

    Landscaping

    • Focus on your curb appeal by bringing in new mulch for garden beds, cleaning up decks and porches and making sure the lawn is mowed.
    • If you have time, plant some flowers to bring some color to your landscape.
    • Continue to clean and declutter.
    • Contact your real estate agent about scheduling photos and marketing notes.
    • Maintain cleaning and decluttering practices throughout the time your home is listed -- you are almost there!

    For more information on selling your house or real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

    Search: View all homes for sale in Asheville

     

    Go Green, Save Green: Budget-Friendly Home Living Tips

    Reduce Reuse Recycle

    Making eco-friendly home improvements does not have to mean large upfitting costs. In fact, many environmentally responsible actions that can be taken surrounding your home involve behavior modification or simple tasks with a modest investment.

    When in doubt, follow the old adage of reduce, reuse and recycle - in that order specifically, to have the most impact on your wallet and our world!  The more steps that you can take at the top of the model to reduce your consumption, the greater financial and environmental difference you will make.  Check out these actions you can take to have a greener home:

    REDUCE to Go Green at Home

    Home EnergyReduce water consumption by taking shorter showers, using one drinking cup throughout the day, collecting rainwater for watering gardens and washing cars, and installing low-flow shower heads.

    Reduce electricity consumption by replacing appliances with Energy Star rated ones only when they absolutely need replacing, by using CFL or LED light bulbs, and using task lighting rather than lighting a whole room.

    Reduce heat loss by installing weather stripping and insulation and lowering your thermostat at night and when you are away from home.

    Have an energy audit performed to assess other ways that you may  improve your energy loss.

    REUSE to Go Green at Home

    GoodwillPurchase reusable containers for food storage and beverage consumption.

    Don’t throw out that leftover rice from burrito night; toss it with olive oil and soy sauce and have fried rice tonight!  The concept of reuse applies to food consumption and has the added benefit of working towards reducing food transportation costs and eliminating waste that goes toward the landfill.

    For the food you cannot bear to consume as leftovers again, throw it in a compost pile where you will be able to reuse it as compost in a few months.

    Pass on clothing and household items that you are done with to a charitable organization so that those items may be reused in our community by people who need them.

    Store wood from home maintenance projects in a dry shed or garage for future projects (you know you will have them) rather than tossing out significant scraps.

    RECYCLE to Go Green at Home

    CompostRecycle yard waste right into your garden. Blow leaves into garden beds for the winter rather than raking them and placing them on the side of the road. With a few good turns into the bed in the spring, you will have added some nice organic matter to the beds. Similarly, collect fallen sticks in your yard to burn in a bonfire rather than purchase bundles of wood.

    Consult your local recycling experts for how to clear your house of unwanted items in an environmentally responsible way. Our local experts in Asheville are found at Asheville Greenworks.

    For information on green living and real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

    Search: View all homes for sale in Asheville

    Search: View all JAG Construction green homes for sale in Asheville

     

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