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Outdoor Activities

Dig These Dog-Friendly Outings Around Asheville

Asheville Dog-Friendly PlacesAsheville is an enjoyable place for every member of your family – including the four-legged ones. Dog-friendly restaurants, hikes and parks abound in and around town, promising that your furry pals can join in on all the non-stop fun Asheville has to offer. And with a growing number of restaurants and other establishments shifting to outdoor-centric service, there are more opportunities than ever for bringing your pup along; here are just a few. 

Eating out in Asheville with your pup

Many restaurants around town allow well-behaved canine companions to come along for the ride. Your best bets are eateries with outdoor and patio seating. Another enjoyable option are the myriad dog-friendly breweries around town, many with open areas for you and your furry friend to mingle and make new ones. From Downtown to River Arts District, check out these pooch-perfect spots:

12 Bones Smokehouse – Plenty of outdoor seating this an ideal destination for you and your dog. www.12bones.com

Zia Taqueria – This West Asheville favorite has expanded its seating into a spacious outdoor spot, with lots of room for Rover. https://ziataco.com

Sunny Point Café – Daytime outdoor counter service coupled with a picnic area means you can enjoy this popular place with your pup. https://sunnypointcafe.com

All Souls Pizza – This River Arts District spot has plenty of outdoor seating at picnic tables and an adjacent open field. http://www.allsoulspizza.com

Posana Café – Along with its eclectic menu, Posana serves dishes specifically designed for dogs, so you and your pooch can park for a meal on the patio, entertained by the buskers that frequently set up nearby. www.posanarestaurant.com

Laughing Seed Café – This vegetarian restaurant offers a laid-back vantage point from its Wall St. patio. www.laughingseed.com

Burial Beer Co. – This downtown brewery also has a full-service kitchen and lots of seating to accommodate you and your pet. https://burialbeer.com/location/avl/

Wicked Weed Brewing – A dog-friendly patio means you can enjoy this popular downtown brewery and restaurant with both four-legged and two-legged friends! https://www.wickedweedbrewing.com

Asheville Dispensary - This West Asheville cafe and dispensary is dog friendly inside their store/lounge and offers outside, covered seating and they sell pet products. https://avldispensary.com/collections/pet-products

Asheville with DogsKennels, specialty shops and daycare

For those times when your dog needs day or overnight care, there are several options from which to choose:

Pet Vet on Patton – In addition to an array of veterinary services, this centrally located office offers boarding, grooming and doggie daycare. http://petvetonpatton.com

Happy Tails Country Club – Their Fairview and Enka facilities are crate-free: Boarders instead have “suites” with full walls. http://happytailscc.com

Patton Avenue Pet Company – Boasting an array of pet food and other items, this store (with multiple locations) offers food delivery, as well as self-dog-washing stations at its South Asheville location. www.pattonavenuepet.com

Pampered Pets Inn and Spa – Play care, a spa, training and boarding are all offered at this location. http://pamperedpetsinnandspa.com

Parks and hikes

Your dog has plenty of exercise options around the area. In addition to the many hiking trails in Asheville, along the Blue Ridge Parkway, and in national forests, there are city parks where (leashed) pooches can play, and fenced dog parks where they can run with abandon:

French Broad River Park and Dog Park

The meandering paths of this West Asheville gem wind along the French Broad River and lead to a large, fenced-in dog park (with an area set off for small dogs), complete with water and poop bags.

Azalea Dog Park

Just beyond the John B. Lewis Soccer complex in East Asheville is the Azalea Dog Park. With large fenced areas for small and big dogs, and plenty of seating and shady spots for their owners, this is a favorite place to mingle with fellow dog lovers.

A wag-worthy welcome center

The Dog City USA Asheville Welcome Center (1 Battle Square) is a one-stop-resource to help dog owners get the most out of their downtown Asheville visit. The first of its kind in the country, the welcome center features tours every Friday designed for dogs and their owners, featuring local shops with doggie goodies, breweries catering to pups, and even special canine dining for you and your dog to enjoy on the town. The center offers a doggy potty area, fresh cold water from doggie drinking fountains, free goody dog bags, dog-friendly public bathrooms, and even human refreshments. http://dogdoorcanineservices.com/Dog-City-USA

To learn about Real Estate in Asheville, email us at Info@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call us anytime at 828-707-9556.

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Warm Up to Socially Distanced Fun With Friends This Fall

Fire Pit OutdoorsSince “social distancing” entered our everyday lexicon in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, finding ways to hang out with small groups of friends in a safe setting has required new, creative outlets. The warmth of Asheville’s summer lent itself to outdoor, spaced and small gatherings (widely accepted to be the best way to see friends and family without spreading the coronavirus). As the chill of fall in Western North Carolina sets in, continuing outdoor meet-ups and hang-outs is still possible. Here are some ideas for fall fun with family and friends while still social distancing.

Fired up – Patio firepits offer an ideal focal point for small outdoor get-togethers. Besides providing warmth, they can do double-duty as a cooking source: Think s’mores on a stick or roasted hotdogs or kabobs on a skewer. Once the fire dies down and you’re left with hot coals, you can treat everyone to a campfire-foil “meal” (chopped veggies and a protein combined in a single-serve packet, placed in the coals – never the fire); this can also work on a grill, and eliminates the need for clean-up or shared serving dishes.

Hot spot – When the temperatures drop, turn your backyard into a cozy outdoor “living room.” Heated blankets and portable space heaters can keep your guests toasty while you socialize under the stars. Or shift hang-outs to the afternoon, while the sun is out and has had a chance to warm things up. 

Garage bond – If you have a spacious garage, roll up the doors, move out the cars and set up some spaced-apart seating for a socializing spot that’s protected from the elements. Also consider carports, covered patios and screened-in decks for small gatherings that can stay safely outdoors.

Asheville Cold Weather HikeHeightened activity – Even though hiking in the mountains is often associated with warm weather, the activity can be enjoyed year-round. Bundle up and meet friends on the trails for a fun way to socialize and get in some blood-pumping exercise. While the Blue Ridge Parkway closes in the colder months, there are still plenty of spots in Western N.C. to hike year-round. Pack a thermos of hot chocolate or savory soup to warm up while you take in the splendor of iced-over foliage, crisp long-range views, and clean, invigorating air. Bonus: Hiking hotspots tend to thin out during the colder, less-busy seasons, which means locals can take advantage of the open spaces to social distance while still enjoying the company of friends.

Happy trails – Asheville is replete with in-town greenways and trails, which means you can enjoy a social stroll or bike ride almost anytime. Take a group mountain bike ride (which naturally lends itself to social distancing!), either in town or a short drive away at one of the popular trails in DuPont State Forest or Pisgah National Forest. 

Eat, drink and be merry – safely – Breweries and restaurants around Asheville have gotten creative since the start of the pandemic, setting up outdoor dining areas, offering touchless ordering, limiting numbers in a group, and taking extra cleaning and safety precautions to stop the spread of coronavirus. As the weather shifts, breweries and eateries continue to offer outdoor seating options, adding heat lamps and space heaters to keep customers warm. So grab your coat and head out for a brew and a bite with friends.

To learn about Real Estate in Asheville, contact us at Info@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call anytime at 828-707-9556.

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Enjoy Autumn Activities at Asheville Area Apple Orchards

Asheville Area Apple OrchardsApple-picking around Western North Carolina is a favorite fall pastime, and everything that comes with an outing to an orchard – think corn mazes, hay rides, and chowing down on warm apple fritters – is what makes autumn in Asheville extra special. With the season starting up, now is the perfect time to experience an enjoyable afternoon of all things apple at one of the area’s many orchards. 

Henderson County apple orchards

Henderson County, 25 miles south of Asheville, is the largest apple-producing one in the North Carolina, which is the seventh-largest apple-producing state in the country. That adds up to a lot of apple-picking opportunities! Between Hendersonville and Chimney Rock along Highway 64, a number of orchards beckon with pick-your-own or pre-picked apples, as well as country markets featuring ciders, apple cider doughnuts, apple fritters, apple cider slushies, jams and the like.

Stepp’s Hillcrest Orchard

This fourth generation working farm offers mountain views to go along with pick-your-own apples, grapes and pumpkins, as well as a market brimming with cider, apple butter and other gifts. Stepp’s offers farm wagon rides through its orchards and pumpkin patch, as well as the ever-popular apple canons. https://steppapples.com

Apple Orchards in WNCGrandad’s Apples

Pre-picked or pick-your-own apples await you at this popular orchard. Grandad’s Barn and Country Store boasts fall decorations and an array of apple-related gifts, as well as apple turnovers, fried pies, apple bread, caramel apples and ice cream. There’s also a corn maze set against a backdrop of long-range mountain views. https://www.grandadsapples.com

Justus Orchard

Offering u-pick or we-pick applies, blackberries and pumpkins, Justus has farm animals and a Cow Train through the orchard to entertain the entire family. The store sells honey, jams, jellies, preserves and other homemade goods, as well as fried apple pies, cider slushies, caramels and more. The orchard also offers mountain cabbage, sweet potatoes and other local fall vegetables. https://justusorchard.com

Sky Top Orchard

Apple Orchards Near AshevilleAlong with pick-your-own apples, Sky Top in Flat Rock offers u-pick peaches, Asian pears and grapes. Make an afternoon of it with a visit to the orchard ponds with ducks and geese, a barnyard with sheep, goats, chickens, turkeys and peacocks, and a bamboo forest for exploring. http://www.skytoporchard.com

Waynesville/Sylva area orchards

Barber Orchards

This fruit stand and bakery is a local favorite. Stop in for a variety of fresh apples, as well as other fall produce. The bakery is known for its apple turnovers, fritters and pies. https://www.facebook.com/BarberOrchardFruitstand

For information on Asheville area real estate, email Info@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call us anytime at 828-707-9556.

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Blue Ridge Mountain Wineries Serve Up Tasty Sips and Sumptuous Scenery

Asheville Area WineriesFor a relaxing daytime excursion, take a visit to one of the many wineries dotting Western North Carolina. These wineries, in and around the Asheville area, offer the opportunity to enjoy tastings and tours as you soak in the stunning surroundings unique to the Blue Ridge Mountains. Make sure to plan ahead: Most wineries take reservations, and it’s best to check their latest COVID-19-related policies before making your visit. 

Biltmore Winery

A visit to this famed winery, in the heart of the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, is included in the price of the admission to the house. The winery offers tours of the facility, as well as complimentary tastings of its handcrafted wines. A range of bottles, cases and snacks to complement its wines is offered in the winery gift shop. https://www.biltmore.com/visit/winery/visit-our-winery/

Addison Farms Vineyard

This family-owned vineyard and winery in Leicester, a short drive from Asheville, boasts a tasting room with mountain views, where you can enjoy samples of wines from its six grape varieties. http://www.addisonfarms.net

Wineries Near Asheville NCTryon Foothills Wine Country

An easy 45-mile drive from Asheville, this area is home to more than 20 vineyards along with four wineries open to visitors. The rolling countryside offers fertile ground for grape-growing, and the surrounding mountains that protect it from harsh weather extremes mean it has the longest growing season in Western N.C. The wineries open to visitors are: family-run Parker-Binns Vineyard, with 40 acres of winery and vineyard (Mill Spring) https://www.parkerbinnsvineyard.com; Overmountain Vineyards, featuring a variety of estate-grown wines (Tryon) https://overmountainvineyards.com; Russian Chapel Hills Winery, with seven varietals as well as a muscadine dessert wine (Columbus) https://www.russianchapelhills.com; and boutique family winery Mountain Brook Vineyards (Tryon) https://www.mountainbrookvineyards.com.

Catawba Valley Wine Tour

This collection of three wineries between Marion and Morganton, about 30 minutes east of Asheville, sits in the foothills of Burke County and takes advantage of the ideal growing conditions for grapes. The three wineries, all within a 15-mile drive, are: South Creek Winery, boasting Bordeaux-style wines (Nebo) http://www.southcreekwinery.com; Silver Fork Vineyard, where you can enjoy samples along with live music, movies and art exhibits (Morganton) https://www.silverforkwinery.com; and Lake James Cellars Winery, where you can try a variety of tastings in a restored 1915 textile mill building (Glen Alpine) https://www.lakejamescellars.com.

Hendersonville Winery Trail

If you’re looking for an easy daytrip from Asheville, consider visiting the Hendersonville Winery Trail, about 25 miles south of downtown Asheville. Take a scenic, 10-mile country drive to sample a range of award-winning wines as you soak in the vineyards’ beautiful settings and mountain views. The vineyards are: Point Lookout Vineyards, with six red and four white wines along with seven meads https://pointlookoutvineyards.com; Saint Paul Mountain Vineyards, which grows 14 grape varieties https://www.saintpaulfarms.com; and Burntshirt Vineyards, a North Carolina Winery of the Year offering 19 wines, as well as winery production tours https://burntshirtvineyards.com.

Want to live within a short drive of these and other Western N.C. wineries? Contact us at Info@MyMosaicRealty.com, or call us anytime at 828-707-9556, for more information about real estate in the Asheville area.

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N.C. Arboretum's Whimsical LEGO Sculpture Exhibit Brings Nature to Life

Lego Exhibit NC ArboretumThe North Carolina Arboretum, the 434-acre public garden located just south of downtown Asheville, is pleased to unveil the one-of-a-kind exhibit Nature Connects®: Art with LEGO® Bricks, a whimsical, toy-filled outdoor adventure. Originally set to open in May but delayed due to the COVID-19 crisis, the exhibit – of which Mosaic Community Lifestyle Realty is a community partner – opened July 1 with an extended schedule, and will remain on display through November 1, 2020. 

Composed of nearly 500,000 LEGO bricks, Nature Connects includes 16 nature-inspired sculptures constructed on a larger-than-life scale by renowned artist Sean Kenney. Among the fanciful sculptures on display are a 5-foot-tall colorful peacock, a giant dragonfly, a bonsai tree and a massive monarch butterfly. This family-friendly exhibit, appealing to a range of ages and interests, draws inspiration from the living world and combines play with science to create an innovative intersection of education, entertainment and environment. 

Daytime admission to Nature Connects is free; however, a standard $16 parking fee applies to non-Arboretum members. When outdoors on the Arboretum grounds, guests are encouraged to wear face coverings whenever they are unable to socially distance themselves from others.

NC Arboretum Lego ExhibitExtending into the evenings

As an added bonus, Nature Connects will take center stage during the Arboretum’s ArborEvenings summer after-hours series. This year, the Arboretum is extending the dates and times of ArborEvenings: The event will be held every Thursday, Friday and Saturday, July through September, from 8 to 11 p.m. (some exclusion dates apply; please check the Arboretum’s website for details).

Visitors to ArborEvenings can sip and stroll through the Arboretum’s beautiful gardens and discover the illuminated LEGO Brick sculptures while listening to live music. Sweet and savory snacks, along with alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, are available for purchase from the Arboretum’s Bent Creek Bistro. 

In addition to the parking fee admission, there is a special ArborEvenings admission price of $5 per person. Proceeds from ArborEvenings go to support The North Carolina Arboretum Society, the Arboretum’s 501(c)(3) non-profit that provides financial assistance to further support the Arboretum’s mission and educational programming. This year, in light of the COVID-19 crisis, 10% of all proceeds from the ArborEvenings event series will be donated directly to MANNA FoodBank, the Feeding America food bank serving over 100,000 people facing hunger across 16 counties of Western North Carolina. 

For more information about the Arboretum or Nature Connects, please visit ncarboretum.org or call 828-665-2492. 

 

 

Soak in the ‘Blue' Hue of the Blue Ridge Mountains

Blue Ridge MountainsNestled among the stunning backdrop of the Blue Ridge Mountains, Asheville is perfectly positioned to offer easy accessibility to all the famed mountain range has to offer. While the Blue Ridge Mountains extend from Georgia to Pennsylvania, the highest peaks are found in Western North Carolina. Living in Asheville affords the opportunity to enjoy the Blue Ridge almost everywhere you turn. 

But what puts the “Blue” in the Blue Ridge? A little science lesson provides the answer: The green trees and thick vegetation that blanket the Blue Ridge emit the hydrocarbon isoprene to protect themselves on excessively hot days. Oak trees, plentiful in these mountains, are particularly active producers of isoprene. When isoprene is released, it interacts with other molecules in the atmosphere. The resulting haze gives the surrounding range its distinctive blue appearance.

With summer upon us and popular spots along the Blue Ridge Parkway opening back up, it’s the perfect time to soak in the “blue” surroundings that have made this region world-famous. Here are a few to check out:

Mount Mitchell Summit and Balsam Nature Trail

This short hike is 31 miles from Asheville along the parkway. A shady balsam-fir forest shrouds the paths to the top of Mount Mitchell, the tallest peak east of the Mississippi at 6,684 feet.

Why are the Blue Ridge Mountains BlueMount Pisgah Trail

You can be to this moderately challenging trail from Asheville in 40 minutes. Hike through lush green forest to reach the tower-capped summit, which offers 360-degree long-range “blue” views.

Craggy Gardens Trail

In season, blooming rhododendron and blueberries line the trail to the grassy mountaintop of Craggy Gardens, 19 miles from Asheville along the parkway. Even when not in bloom, the trail, framed in ghostly gnarled branches, still draws hikers to its surreal beauty. 

Graveyard Fields Trail

One of the parkway’s most popular hikes, Graveyard Fields offers waterfalls, gorgeous “blue” views, and wild blueberries and blackberries for picking – all just 34 miles from Asheville.

Black Balsam Knob and Tennent Mountain Loop

A 5-mile loop takes you over two summits, affording amazing views of the blueness surrounding you, from trails that cut through the grassy balds of Black Balsam Knob and Tennent Mountain.

Visitor Center Loop

An easy, smooth hike, the Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center loop offers the perfect terrain for youngsters or those not wanting to venture too far into the woods or too far away from the parking area.

And for some even closer opportunities to immerse yourself in the “blue” of the Blue Ridge:

Craven Gap

This trail, accessible at the end of Town Mountain Road in Craven Gap, is 15 minutes from downtown Asheville, but feels worlds away. It’s proximity to the city, easy hiking, and beautiful backdrop make it a popular spot for locals and visitors alike – including President Obama and wife Michelle, who hiked the trail during a 2010 visit to the area.

Folk Art Center Trail to Bull Mountain

A popular, well-maintained spot located just outside the city limits, the Folk Art Center Trail winds along the Mountains to Sea Trail, a rolling path interspersed with short steep climbs.

If you’re interested in finding an Asheville-area home from which to enjoy the Blue Ridge Mountains every day, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190. 

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Enjoy the Full Bloom of Western N.C. Flower Farms

Asheville FarmsSummer is blossoming, and so are Asheville-area flower farms. From fresh offerings of peonies and poppies to zinnias and dahlias, there is no shortage of ways to bring the vibrant outdoor colors in. Flower farms provide their wares at farmers’ markets across Western North Carolina, or through flower bouquet shares (similar to CSA shares). Some farms also offer pick-your-own options for guests to create custom clusters.

Flying Cloud Farm – This Fairview farm sells its blooms in mixed bouquets at the River Arts District Farmers Market (Wednesdays) and the North Asheville Tailgate Market (Saturdays). And flower bouquet shares can be tacked on to Flying Cloud’s produce CSA shares: Each week, a fresh bouquet accompanies your box for the 20-week regular CSA season. Flying Cloud flowers are also available at its farm roadside stand every day May through mid-October. In addition, you can pick your own at the farm mid-July through mid-October. Website: http://www.flyingcloudfarm.net/

Bloom – Bloom, located in Black Mountain, is a pesticide-free, no-till farm offering unique specialty flowers. During spring and summer, the best way to guarantee the first and best cuts of flowers is with Bloom’s subscription shares. Being a shareholder allows you to come to the farm once a week and choose your own flowers by the stem, or select a pre-paid bouquet. Website: www.farmerfloristbloom.com

Asheville Flower FarmFull Sun Farm – Flowers from this Leicester farm are available at both the River Arts District and North Asheville markets, with mixed bouquets and sunflower bunches among its most popular. The farm also offers fresh-picked field flowers for weddings and other special events, as well as weekly flower shares. Website: http://www.fullsunfarm.com

Lady Luck Flower Farm – If you’re looking for a seasonal bouquet, you’re in luck – Lady Luck, to be precise. This farm in Leicester grows a variety of flowers from spring to fall, of which they hand-select the perfect blooms to create bouquets for sale at French Broad Food Co-op May through October. https://ladyluckflowerfarm.com

Ivy Creek Family Farm – The field-grown flowers at Ivy Creek in Barnardsville are selected for their beauty, long vase life, and diversity. Ivy Creek produces three main products with its flowers: pre-made bouquets, bulk buckets (long-stem and table flowers), and custom-designed arrangements. Ivy Creek sells bouquets at the North Asheville Tailgate Market and Weaverville Tailgate Market from April to October. Bouquets change weekly with the flowers of the season. https://ivycreekfamilyfarm.com

The Never-Ending Flower Farm – This farm, located in the Big Ivy community of Barnardsville, offers wholesale flowers to florists and designers, full-service wedding floral design, and U-Pick options. Peak season starts in July with the arrival of the Dahlia blooms; other flower crops include peonies and hydrangea paniculata. The farm also grows a wide range of annuals and perennials that it incorporates into its design work. The flower field is honor system payment, with an info table set up at the top of the field. https://www.theneverendingflowerfarm.com

Learn More: About Asheville

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Low-maintenance Gardening Makes Lush Landscapes Easy

Native Perennials for Easy GardeningFor those who love the look of a summer yard brimming with blooms and showy foliage but don’t want to have to toil in the soil, a low-maintenance garden bed or a micro-garden is the ideal option. Low-maintenance gardens are exactly what they sound like – a collection of plantings chosen for their ease of care. Micro-gardens allow your green thumb to flourish on a small, easy-to-handle scale – think patio containers, window boxes and flower pots. Following are some tips on taking on either this summer.

Choose natives to Western N.C.

Native plants are an easy addition to a low-maintenance garden. They are already adapted to native soil types of Western North Carolina and generally grow best with little attention. Maximize your success by matching the right plants with the right site conditions: Take into account available light, moisture and soil pH, and for ideas look to nearby natural areas to observe how native plants grow naturally.

Some native plants to consider are: ferns such as Lady Fern and Hay-scented Fern; grasses and sedges such as Big Bluestem; ground covers like Wild Strawberry and Wild Blue Phlox; and wildflowers like Butterfly Milkweed and Blackeyed Susan.

Low Maintenance GardeningPack in perennials

A garden bed packed with perennials promises blooms year after year, with minimal-to-no work. Add in flowering perennials that require no deadheading, and you can literally sit back and enjoy the fruits of your one-time labor!

Perennials require less yearly maintenance, saving you money, energy and time by not having to clear out garden beds and replant every year. They also don’t require annual composting or mulching.

Perennial root systems offer some amazing advantages, not only to the perennials themselves, but to surrounding plants and soil. Because they don’t need to be pulled up and replanted each year, the soil remains undisturbed and structurally strong. The roots aerate and channel the ground, allowing water to travel more efficiently. This benefits shallow-rooted plants nearby, which draw moisture and nutrients up from the surface of the perennial roots.

Hardy perennials provide ground cover and preserve moisture. You can choose perennials that continue to benefit your yard through the winter, dying back in the colder months yet keeping enough foliage to cover the soil and protect it.

The magic of mulch 

Adding a layer of mulch to your garden bed helps to prevent weeds from proliferating among your plants, saving you time and effort. Mulch also prevents erosion, an issue in the many hilly yards common in the Asheville area. It allows water to drip into the soil, rather than run off the surface and strip topsoil with it. Mulch also helps to retain moisture, so you don’t have to water as much. And it aids in regulating soil temperature, protecting plants from extremes that can stress and weaken them.

Easy Gardening TipsDepending on what you use, mulch can help to add nutrients and improve your soil over time. Natural mulch gradually decomposes, helping to aerate soil and prevent it from becoming compacted and hard.

Micro gardening options

If you’d like to grow plants and vegetables on a smaller, easier-to-handle scale, micro gardening is the way to go. Flowers, greens and herbs are micro favorites, but really anything can be grown with this method of gardening. All you need is a small outdoor space and a container.

Window boxes and flower pots are great for micro gardening, and having such containers can make it easier to tend to plants and amend the soil specifically to each plant’s needs. Micro gardening usually requires seed selection and germination, moist, rich soil, and a warm environment to start.

Depending on the type of vegetables or herbs planted, a micro garden can begin producing within two weeks of first leaf formation. The result is fresh, nutritious food for you and your family, easily attained with some tending.

Read More: How to Create an Eco-Friendly Landscape

 

 

These Asheville-Area Spots Offer Peak Sunset Views

Asheville Sunset Views

There’s very little that can visually match Asheville’s stunning sunsets and accompanying color play against a Blue Ridge backdrop. Pretty much any elevated point in the area will afford you some amazing sunset views, but if you’re looking for that guaranteed wow factor, here are the spots to check out.

Grove Park Inn

The famed inn, perched above North Asheville with expansive grounds at its feet, offers a perfect spot to sit back and soak in a broad, unobstructed view of the sunset. Bonus: You can enjoy dinner or cocktails while feasting on nature’s majestic show. www.omnihotels.com/hotels/asheville-grove-park

Sunsets in AshevilleDowntown rooftop bars

Downtown Asheville has many rooftop bars and restaurants from which to watch the setting sun, many with outdoor firepits that allow for a year-round experience. Among them are Hemingway’s Cuba www.hemingwayscuba.com and Capella on 9 www.capellaon9.com.

Max Patch

Max Patch, a bald mountain 48 miles from Asheville on the N.C.-Tenn. border, is a major landmark along the Appalachian Trail. Climbing the moderate two-mile loop will reward you with 360-degree views, including superb sunset (and sunrise) scenery. As with any mountaintop sunset adventure, smartphone flashlights come in handy for the darker descent back to your car, so don’t forget yours!   

Biltmore Estate

There are innumerable spots all over the Biltmore Estate’s 4,000+ acres from which to watch the sun’s display as it sets. Bring a blanket and relax on the sloping lawn adjacent to the home, or visit the estate’s Antler Hill Village for unobstructed sky views from benches and seating areas dotting the grounds. Hike the trails around the house and find a perfectly private spot for some stellar sunset viewing. https://www.biltmore.com

Blue Ridge Parkway

The parkway offers plenty of places to stop for a seasonal sunset experience. A favorite is Waterrock Knob (at milepost 451.2) – with panoramic picnic spots near the parking lot, a visitor center and restrooms (all open in season).

Another favorite, Craggy Pinnacle, is a short, 1.4-mile roundtrip hike to the top of a 5,892-foot summit. The hike, which starts at Craggy Gardens visitor center (milepost 364), will take you along beautiful, rhododendron-draped trails, opening up to a 360-degree view.

Roan Mountain

If you’re in the mood to trek, Roan Mountain, located near the N.C.-Tenn. state line, 76 miles from Asheville, provides an abundance of points along its terrain to take in the sunset. The Appalachian Trail winds along the grassy summits of its five-mile ridgetop, which climbs to 6,286 feet, and the mountain offers the largest natural rhododendron garden, as well as the longest stretch of grassy bald in the Appalachian range. Bring a picnic and make a day of hiking and exploring, then top the experience off with a sunset display like no other. 

If you’d like to live close enough to these spots to experience them anytime, or better yet, if you want to find an Asheville home with its own built-in sunset views, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Asheville's a Winner on the Weather Front: Weather Trends in Asheville

Asheville Weather in the Fall

Asheville attracts visitors and transplants for a variety of reasons, one of which is its temperate year-round climate. Never too extreme in any one direction, Asheville weather boasts four distinct seasons, with surprise bursts of warmth in the winter, as well as periodically cool evenings in the middle of summer. 

Spring Weather AshevilleTemperature trends in Asheville

With an elevation of around 2,200 feet, Asheville winters are relatively mild. While the mountain peaks surrounding the city might be snow-capped, downtown Asheville is often shielded from extreme cold. Temperatures in January, the coldest month of the year, average around 47 for the high and 28 for the low. But it’s not unusual to see the mercury reach into the 60s in the wintertime.

Asheville’s crisp falls and springs make these seasons the best times to enjoy outdoor activities. From March to May and September to early November, temperatures range between the upper 50s and the mid-70s – ideal for enjoying a stroll through downtown Asheville in the spring or hiking amid vibrant foliage in the fall. 

During the summer months (June to August), the city sees an increase in humidity. However, it’s still one of the less humid parts of the Southeast, which makes Asheville the perfect regional escape during the dog days of summer. The hottest month of the year – July – sees an average high of 85 and an average low of 65.

Winter Weather in AshevilleThe skinny on snow and rain in Asheville

While Asheville gets about 44 inches of rain per year (compared with the U.S. average of 38 inches), it gets much less snow (10 inches per year) than the national average. Snowfall is greater in the mountains surrounding Asheville, which benefits the ski resorts and snow-tubing runs dotting the range. 

Asheville enjoys about 200 sunny days per year. The wettest month is June, with about 4.7 inches of rain. The driest month, with the lowest rainfall, is October (2.9 inches).

Interested in setting down roots and enjoying Asheville’s weather year-round? Please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190 to find the perfect property for you.

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