Asheville nc

Creativity and Culture Nestled Among Natural Wonders

In recent years, Asheville North Carolina’s cultural draws have the town ranking in many national lists.  Known as a visual and performing arts hub as well as a foodie and microbrew destination, Asheville has much appeal for the cultured visitor.  

However, long before it’s popularity as a refined destination, outdoor enthusiasts have ventured to this area.  Historically, Asheville has been a tourist destination for a century and a half due to its refreshing air, mountain vistas and healing mineral springs.

With loads of state and national park destinations within an hour’s drive, Asheville is the perfect jumping off point for numerous outdoor adventures with a welcoming return to the finest comforts of civilization.  

Blue Ridge Parkway

Blue Ridge ParkwayThe Blue Ridge Parkway, a stunning winding mountain road, stretches 469 miles along the ridge of the Blue Ridge Mountains and passes straight through Asheville.  Breathtaking vistas, highland blueberry fields, waterfall hikes and elevation hikes are some of the attractions.  Just a few miles off of the Parkway in south Asheville you can stop by some of the town’s finest restaurants for rejuvenation: Tupelo Honey Cafe, Farm Burger and Twelve Bones Smokehouse.  

Pisgah National Forest

Pisgah National ForestThough Pisgah National Forest is over 500,000 acres of hardwood forests crisscrossed with white water, some of its most impressive natural wonders are within an easy hour drive of Asheville.  Swim in Looking Glass Falls swimming hole, race down the famous and frigid Sliding Rock or ascend Looking Glass Rock for one of the most spectacular views in the southeast.

Chimney Rock State Park

The pinnacle of Chimney Rock State Park is the 315 foot tower of stone known as the Chimney Rock itself.  It overlooks Lake Lure, the Rocky Broad River and Hickory Nut Gorge.  The river there is a destination for trout anglers and the amazing rock formations draw climbers from across the region.

Mount Mitchell State Park

Mount MitchellJust 35 miles northeast of downtown Asheville, explore Mount Mitchell State Park, the highest point east of the Mississippi River.  Bundle up for the mile high hikes and breezy picnic!  This peak is a popular ascent for road bikers who take the Blue Ridge Parkway from Asheville and distance trail runners who are up for the challenge of the rocky and technical climbing trails.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

The gorgeous Great Smoky Mountains National Park just West of Asheville features camping, horseback riding, fishing and hiking on more than 800 miles of trails.  There are 6 visitor centers and over a dozen waterfalls.  For a stunning geographical wonder, check out Clingman’s Dome at an elevation of 6,643 feet!

Appalachian Trail

The Appalachian Trail, a national scenic trail, winds from Georgia to Maine but comes within an hour’s drive to Asheville in several special points.  Climb up to the highland bald at Max Patch for nearly 360 degree views as the Appalachian trail traverses it.  Or, head north of Asheville to Hot Springs where you can catch a short section of the trail after soaking in the natural mineral springs, having a microbrew at a local pub or kayaking the French Broad River.

If you appreciate both the creature comforts of a small city brimming with culture and proximity to spectacular natural beauty and outdoor adventure, then Asheville may have a home for you.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Lakeside Living in Asheville: Lakeview Park


Lake View Park Neighborhood from Mosaic Realty on Vimeo.

 

A Brief History of Lakeview Park

 

In the early 1900s, the area that is now Beaver Lake was a quiet meadow known as Baird Bottom where livestock grazed.  During this time, a trolley system ferried vacationers back and forth between Asheville and Weaverville.

 

In 1923, esteemed urban planner and landscape architect John Nolen designed the neighborhood and recreational lake.  According to local legend, famous Asheville-born author Thomas Wolfe would occasionally go skinny dipping in the lake when darkness fell.

 

Beaver Lake and Park

 

Today, the lake and surrounding park and trail system are privately owned and maintained by residents of Lakeview Park.  On any given day, you will see both residents and guests enjoying the park.  A walking trail was recently extended to the full circumference of the lake.  Residents can store canoes and kayaks at the lake for a fee.

 

Just south of Beaver Lake you will find the Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary.  This is a 3/8th mile long boardwalk that winds through the wetlands of Beaver Lake.  There are benches to stop and observe the various species of native and migratory birds that come to feed and rest near the lake.

Beaver Lake Asheville

 

Beaver Lake, North Asheville

 

The Community

 

Only 4 miles from downtown Asheville, this neighborhood offers the convenience of being close to town with the serenity of lakeside living.  The water and ample green space of this size is rare to find so close to the city center.  Many architectural styles, from historic to contemporary, grace the gentle topography of the neighborhood.

 

Merrimon Avenue, the main road leading into the city from Lakeview Park, has all of the conveniences you would need.  There are 5 or more grocery stores to choose from.  Many favorite local eateries also line this road, including Zen Sushi, Marco’s Pizzeria, and Homegrown restaurant.  You can watch a movie and grab a beer at Asheville Pizza and Brewing then cross Merrimon for some locally made ice cream at The Hop.

 

Living in Asheville

 

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

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Suggested Reading and Sources:

 

Lakeview Park

 

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By Just in Asheville

 

Spotlight on South Asheville: Biltmore Park Neighborhood

Dog on Sidewalkphoto credit: http://gratisography.com/

 

Biltmore Park is a neighborhood unlike any other in Asheville.  It was intentionally designed as a walkable 21st century community where you can live, work, shop and play all in the same area.  You can really find much of what you need via foot or bike. However, the community is convenient to interstate, the Asheville airport, and many major grocery stores and shopping retailers.

Biltmore Park Town Square

This vibrant mixed-use development in South Asheville was planned to look like a city-center.  The mostly brick structures house commercial businesses on the street level and residences above.

Some of the locals’ favorite establishments for dining include Neo Burrito and Brixx Pizza for casual dining and P.F. Chang’s for more upscale dining.  Stroll on over to Ya Ya’s Frozen Yogurt after dinner.

You can also do much of your shopping in the town center.  REI has a major store there for equipping all of your outdoor adventures.  The kids will be delighted by the offerings of local toy supplies O.P. Taylor’s.

There are plenty of opportunities for entertainment in the town center.  There is a branch of the YMCA, a movie theatre, and even a brew pub, Thirsty Monk, boasting all of the area’s best microbrews on tap.

Styles of Homes in Biltmore Park

You will find a variety of homes in Biltmore Park.  For the urbanite, you can live in a town home style condo above one of the many businesses in town center.  Just outside of town center, there are mid-size single family homes on modest lots.  As you move farther away from town center, the homes and lots increase in size until you reach the palatial homes tucked away on the wooded mountainside overlooking the neighborhood.

Walkable Neighborhood

This planned community was designed with walkability and green living in mind.  Estes elementary school, Koontz Intermediate school, Valley Springs Middle School and TC Roberson High School are all walkable or bikeable from most of the neighborhood.  This is one of the highest-performing school districts in the area.

Take the well-maintained and shady paved path that winds throughout the area to a neighbor’s house or to the town center.  You can walk to the community pool, a benefit included in community dues.  The public library, located next to the high school, is also an easy walk from Biltmore Park homes.

Community in Biltmore Park

This south Asheville neighborhood thrives on community connectivity.  Twice a year, there is a huge garage sale that draws people from all over the area.  There is also a Fourth of July parade for the children.  You can always make new friends at the community pool and park.

Proximity to Green Spaces

Biltmore Park is a wonderful neighborhood if you value proximity to green spaces and outdoor adventure.  The Mountain to Sea Trail, a trail that runs from the Great Smoky Mountains to North Carolina’s outer banks, runs right along the border of Biltmore Park.  Furthermore, it is approximately a ten minute drive to both the  North Carolina Arboretum and Bent Creek Trails and Experimental Forest.  Zen Tubing has a launch point on the French Broad River just across from the Arboretum’s entrance.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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View homes for sale in Biltmore Park


Sources and Further Reading: Biltmore Park Homeowners

Biltmore Park Planned Community



 

 

 


 


 

6 Ways You can Build Community in Your Neighborhood | Asheville NC

Community Gathering

Of all of the facets that a buyer analyzes when considering a neighborhood, the quality of community relations is often overlooked.  Details such as heated square footage, lot size, updates and layout often predominate searches.  However, the nature of the community has a tremendous impact on many people’s enjoyment of their neighborhood.  Fortunately, community can be fostered!  Here are 6 tips for creating community-with an Asheville spin:

1. Create Common Spaces

With all of the emphasis in Western culture on drawing lines in the sand, if a few neighbors share a little space, it can create a world of difference in neighbor relations.  Creating a community garden with shared work and shared bounty provides continued opportunities for connecting.  Asheville has several stellar examples of community gardens.  Montford Community Garden in Montford Historic District and Falconhurst Community Garden in West Asheville are among these.  

Another trend in Asheville neighborhoods is the emergence of the Little Free Library movement.  There are over 20 registered free libraries within Asheville.  Stewards of neighborhood libraries place a small library somewhere on their property near the street.  It is the community’s responsibility and privilege to both keep the library stocked and enjoy its treasures.

Community GardenIndividuals can create common recreational areas in their yards and invite the community to enjoy it.  For example, put up a basketball goal in your cul de sac or driveway.  If you own a pool, create a flag system where you put up a green flag if you are willing to host open pool hours and a red flag if you want private pool time.

    2. Hold Regular Community Gatherings

Planned community gatherings, where there is an attempt made to include every neighbor, is a fantastic way to meet all of the individuals living near you.  Even if no one is willing to host a large group of people, park spaces and community centers make great gathering places.  Some churches and businesses are even willing to allow the use of their parking lot.  Several neighborhoods in Asheville have been known to host block parties by officially closing off their street for a few hours.

Some ideas for community gatherings are yearly yard sales like the ones held in Biltmore Park and Malvern Hills or community potlucks.  On Halloween, the neighborhood surrounding Vermont Avenue in Historic West Asheville goes to great lengths to decorate their homes and hand out tons of candy.  People come from far away to attend this community-hosted gathering.

     3.  Organize a Community Fundraiser

There is no greater way to really get to know your neighbors than to put your heads together and raise money for a cause.  The Montford neighborhood hosts an annual music and art festival where all proceeds go to fund community projects and activities of the Montford Neighborhood Association.  Malvern Hills neighborhood hosts an annual food drive, bringing hundreds of pounds of non-perishable items to MANNA food bank yearly.  

     4.  Volunteer together as a neighborhood

Stream Clean UpWith as many nonprofits as there are in Asheville, there are so many ways to rally your neighbors together in a group volunteer effort.  One of our favorite nonprofits, Asheville GreenWorks, is happy to outfit your group with all that you need to do a litter pick-up in your neighborhood.  River-Link is your go-to resource for adopting a stream in your neighborhood.

      5.  Create a Community-Friendly Front Yard

Instead of installing tall fences in your front yard, consider installing benches and half-walls good for sitting on.  Plant blueberry bushes and raspberry bushes near the front of the yard and encourage neighbors to help themselves.  Plant beautiful perennial borders both on the inside of your fence and on the outside for your neighbors to enjoy.  

      6.  Go Out on a Walk to Know Your Community

The easiest thing that you can do in your neighborhood to create community is to simply get out and stroll.  Stopping and talking with neighbors, delivering a newspaper to an elderly person’s door, and frequenting lemonade stands of neighborhood kids will let you make those invaluable connections.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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River Arts District Neighborhood of Asheville = RAD

River Arts District Asheville

Undeniably, the neighborhood in Asheville that is undergoing the most radical change at the moment is the River Arts District.

This district is situated just southwest of downtown Asheville, nestled between the bustling central business district, historic Biltmore Village and funky West Asheville.  The French Broad River defines the neighborhood’s western border and brings with it many eager river adventurers.  However, it has not always been quite the cultural hub that it is now.

History of the River Arts District in Asheville

Historic River Arts District AshevilleBy the late 1800s, Asheville’s industrial district had settled in the low-lying area surrounding the French Broad River.  During this time, the railroad, still active today as the Norfolk Southern, brought scores of people to town.

In the 1980s, as downtown Asheville began to see a slow renaissance and artists faced higher rents there, many of them set up shop in the industrial buildings lining the banks of the French Broad River.  1994 marked the first official studio stroll, and hence the name River Arts District began to take effect.  

Around the turn of the century, a few Asheville entrepreneurs began to recognize the opportunity in the area and set up businesses such as the Grey Eagle Music Hall and the Wedge Brewery, which are still thriving today.  The momentum has continued through the last 15 years with many businesses experiencing success in the area.

Today, there are plans for a Visitor’s Center with public parking and restrooms and many other improvements in the works.  The city was awarded a federal grant titled Tiger VI to improve transportation in and around the River District.  Ahead of the improved infrastructure, many local businesses are looking to be a part of this area.

River Arts District Culture

River Arts StudiosThis neighborhood is one of the most walkable neighborhoods in Asheville. (Link)  It’s friendliness to alternative transportation is only increasing as the city is investing more and more in infrastructure for greenways, sidewalks and bike lanes.  

The plethora of craft beers, artisan cocktails, fine dining and casual bites to eat is overwhelming and on the rise.  Our detailed blog post on river culture in Asheville lays out some of our favorite destinations in the River Arts District as well as some outstanding pass times.

Architectural Styles of the River Arts District

 Historic cottages dot the hillside of Chicken Hill, facing west over the river and south over the center of the business district.  In the past few years, some historic industrial buildings have been renovated to include studio apartments near artists’ studio spaces.  

New construction is popping up all along the River Arts District featuring mostly condos and modern style homes.  These homes are designed to reduce urban sprawl and to take advantage of the walkability of this neighborhood.

For more information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Sources/Further Reading: The History of the River Arts District

 

 

3 Must-Hear Free Music Events in Asheville This Spring

 

River Music Festival Asheville

Asheville has a long and storied tradition of having a deep connection to music.  Early settlers of the area brought with them musical instruments from their native countries: the fiddle from Ireland, the mandolin from Italy and the banjo from Africa among them.  The resulting collaboration of these musicians was Appalachian music, the forebear of the more modern string band sound of today.

 

Today's Asheville music tradition is not limited to the roots music of Appalachia.  Multiple genres of music are represented in Asheville's world class music venues, recording studios, and on the streets.  

 

Festivals and outdoor concerts have become a staple in Asheville area entertainment.  Here, we feature 3 free outdoor music events that you should not miss this spring!

 

River Music by RiverLink

 

River Link, an Asheville nonprofit largely responsible for improving the health of the French Broad River and the vitality of the River Arts District, hosts 5 nights of free music by the French Broad.  The events are usually held the second Friday of each month from May until October.  

 

This is not only a great opportunity to hear free local music by our gorgeous river, but you will be directly helping the community by attending!  The concert series raises funds for the non-profit's programming.

 

Asheville Downtown Association Presents Steep Canyon Rangers

 

On Saturday, June 11th, the Asheville Downtown Association will be throwing a free community concert on the lawn of the park at Pack Place.  At 6pm the concert will begin with an opening band and by 7pm, Grammy-award winning band Steep Canyon Rangers will take the stage.  

 

Asheville Downtown Association strives to advocate for the vitality of downtown.  This event marks one of the first times that this newly enhanced park has been used for a community concert.  Mosaic Realty is a  proud sponsor of this event, along with other Asheville and Western North Carolina businesses such as Oskar Blues Brewery, Alchemy Design Studio, and Platt Architecture.  

 

 

Asheville Flat Iron Musicians

West Asheville's Own: All Go West Music Festival

 

On Saturday, June 25th of 2016, the streets of one of Asheville's most hip neighborhoods will be filled with festifarians.  West Asheville's main corridor, Haywood Road, will be home to a one day community music and art celebration called All Go West Music Festival.  The festival kicks off at 11am and will be going strong until 2am.

 

The Lineup

 

This free festival features four stages and diverse genres of music.  The festival has attracted some national acts such as headliners Kool Keith, the Digs, Marcus King Band, and Floating Action.  Local favorites include the Laura Blackley and the Wildflowers and Andrew Scotchie and the River Rats.  Spanning genres from world music to rop to folk to hip hop, there are at least 35 acts on the roster to appear over the course of the day.  Approximately half of them are local bands with a connection to West Asheville.  

 

Venues

 

Venues include the main stage, sponsored by Hi-Wire Brewing, and stages at the Isis Music Hall, The Mothlight, and West Asheville's most popular gas station, the Brew Pump.

 

Festival organizer Arieh Samson aims to “get music lovers in front of new artists, build community, and encourage people to push their boundaries."  It is my prediction that this event will be a stellar success.  No community is more ready to build their musical vision and push their boundaries than that of Asheville.

 

For information on real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at mike@mymosaicrealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

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Asheville Trails That Aren't a Hike to Get To

Hikes Near Asheville NC

Western North Carolina is renowned for world-class hikes to suit all tastes and experience levels. Living in Asheville affords easy day trips to every manner of mountain trail. But what if you just want a quick lunchtime loop or an easy afternoon jaunt without going far? Asheville and the immediate area around it are replete with spontaneous options sure to stimulate the senses and pump the blood. Below, a few favorites.

NC Arboretum Explorer Loop

For a nearby hike you can do in just a few hours, head to the North Carolina Arboretum in southwest Asheville, near the banks of the French Broad River. The 4.4-mile loop offers beautifully maintained and gently grade trails that are perfect for young hikers and those looking for a less arduous route. The trail traces the perimeter of the Arboretum, beginning at Hardtimes Road and culminating at the beautiful gardens and sculptures surrounding the Visitor Education Center.

Destination Center Track Trail

The Blue Ridge Parkway visitor center at milepost 384 near Asheville offers an easy, 1.4-mile loop trail that starts at the far end of the visitor center parking lot. The trail allows visitors to enjoy the Parkway’s nature without venturing too far from the road, and also connects to the Mountains-to-Sea Trail. Stop into the center before the hike to get a map, talk to a ranger, pick up some merchandise, learn about other area offerings, watch the park film, and explore Parkway-themed exhibits.

Bent Creek North Loop

Bent Creek Experimental Forest AshevilleThis southwest Asheville trail nestled in Bent Creek Experimental Forest offers views of Enka, Candler and Biltmore Lake along its 8-mile loop. The hike starts at Rice Pinnacle Trailhead and runs along Deer Lake Lodge Trail, up the slopes of Little Hickory Top. The payoff of the moderately difficult climb along the trail is reaching Ingles Field Gap and tracing Stradley Ridge to take in long-range views of west Asheville and Enka.

Haw Creek Valley Overlook

From the Folk Art Center just east of Asheville to the Haw Creek Overlook runs a 5-mile, out-and-back trail featuring a moderate course overflowing with wildflowers and wild mushrooms in season. The gradually uphill hike follows the Mountains-to-Sea Trail along the Blue Ridge Parkway north from the Folk Art Center at milepost 382 to the mountain just above Haw Creek Valley Overlook, which offers picturesque mountain and valley views. When you’re done hiking, you can stop into the center to view a variety of Appalachian arts and crafts and, in season, enjoy daily craft demonstrations and talk to the craftspeople as they work.

For a personally guided tour of neighborhoods near local hiking trails, or for more information on real estate anywhere in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

 

Recreation Rules at Asheville's Biltmore Lake

Biltmore Lake Neighborhood Asheville

Luxurious lakeside living in the heart of the Western North Carolina mountains is the hallmark of Biltmore Lake, a master-planned community of more than 650 homes just 20 minutes southwest of downtown Asheville. The beauty of living at Biltmore Lake is that you can feel like you’re on a mountain vacation every day, without even leaving your neighborhood: Lake and Blue Ridge views abound, as do outdoor activities along Biltmore Lake’s trail system and in and around its lake. The neighborhoods – which feature everything from town homes to cottages to estate homes – seamlessly connect via sidewalk-lined streets, nature trails and idyllic common areas.

Biltmore Lake is Overflowing with Outdoor Amenities

Biltmore Lake Neighborhood AshevilleResidents of Biltmore Lake enjoy a range of onsite activities and amenities, maintained by the Biltmore Lake Community Association. Four miles of hardwood forest and rhododendron-enveloped trails offer plenty of opportunity for biking, running, walking or just enjoying the surrounding nature. There are four campsites alongside the trail system, two adjacent to the lake’s shoreline, and two on Scott’s Ridge’s higher elevation.

The lake offers an outlet for all manner of nonmotorized water sports, from canoeing and kayaking to paddleboating and sunfish sailing, all available for use from the Biltmore Lake boathouse. Fishing is also a popular pastime on Biltmore Lake. A sandy beach provides the perfect spot for sunning with a good book.

Sense of Community at Biltmore Lake

Walking Trails at Biltmore LakeBiltmore Lake also boasts playgrounds, two tennis courts, a basketball court and a clubhouse. The community association hosts a monthly fourth Friday social for neighbors to meet and mingle. In addition, the association coordinates a wide variety of activities for residents throughout the year, from clubs and lectures to live concerts.

Outside of Biltmore Lake, outdoor adventures are only a short drive away. One can take a hike through Pisgah National Forest; enjoy a scenic drive up the Blue Ridge Parkway; or enjoy water activities on the French Broad River.

Shopping and Dining, Minutes Away in Asheville

Biltmore Lake residents enjoy amazing proximity to a range of commercial amenities. Just minutes away is Biltmore Park Town Square in South Asheville, a mixed-use center featuring an array of stores, restaurants and other amenities, including Regal Biltmore Grande Stadium, P.F. Chang’s China Bistro, REI, Brixx Wood Fired Pizza Oven, the Reuter YMCA, Barnes & Noble and more.

Well-regarded public and private schools, including Hominy Valley Elementary School, Enka Middle and High schools, and Carolina Day School, serve the community.

For a personally guided tour of Biltmore Lake, or for more information on real estate here or anywhere in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Unique, Locally Crafted Holiday Gifts Abound in Asheville

Asheville Local Gifts

Holiday shopping’s in full swing, and Asheville offers an amazing range of locally made gift ideas to please just about everyone on your list, from foodies to art aficionados to fashion-forward friends and family. Below, a small sampling of the many Western N.C.-crafted wares sure to wow.

Local Asheville Cookbooks

For a gift with some local flavor – quite literally – look no further than the array of cookbooks offered by the area’s popular eateries. Featuring signature dishes to replicate at home, these cookbooks cover a range of cuisines: Among them, “12 Bones Smokehouse: A Mountain BBQ Cookbook,” “Biscuit Head: New Southern Biscuits, Breakfasts, and Brunch” , Sunny Point Café’s “Breakfast and Beyond: Comfort Food From Dawn to Dark”, and “Curate: Authentic Spanish Food From an American Kitchen”.

An Asheville Art Form

Asheville Local GiftsCapture the creative spirit of the region with a piece crafted by one of myriad artisans who live and work in Western N.C. From paintings and pottery to jewelry and apparel, there’s no shortage of gift ideas that perfectly encapsulate Asheville. Places to peruse local art include the Kress Emporium, the Woolworth Walk, the Folk Arts Center, the Westside Artist Co-op, and of course the River Arts District.

Think Outside the (Gift) Box

Asheville offers a number of gift ideas for that hard-to-impress friend. If you’re looking for a standout surprise this holiday, you won’t be disappointed: think Firecracker Hot Honey at Asheville Bee Charmer, a custom-made bamboo/organic cotton nightgown from On the Inside Lingerie, or Chocolate Sip! Dark Chocolate at French Broad Chocolates.

Asheville Local GiftsFor the budding folk musician on your list, a handcrafted stringed Woodrow Rambler, with a mandolin-like tone, makes the perfect first instrument (complete with an instructional songbook). Funny, cheeky handmade t-shirts for adults and kids – think standout stocking stuffers – are aplenty at Moonlight Makers. Custom-made leather sandals (along with belts and other leather goods) created to perfectly suit the recipient can be had at Paul Taylor Sandals.

A Local Asheville Gift for Liquid Lovers

Locally brewed beer is plentiful in Asheville, and most breweries have limited-edition holiday beers perfectly packaged for gift-giving. For a unique holiday party gift, bestow a pack of locally crafted Holiday Kombucha from Buchi. Or consider a growler of Appalachian Ginger beer from Ginger’s Revenge. For cider lovers, Noble Cider’s Friar Fig complements the season with flavors hinting of the holidays.

For more information about our area or about real estate in Asheville, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com  or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.

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Enjoy an Embellished Asheville This Holiday Season

Biltmore Holiday Lights Asheville

Do you light up at the thought of the holidays? So does Asheville – quite literally! Every year, festive displays of glittering, glorious decorations adorn Asheville and the surrounding areas and make already breathtaking vistas even more dazzling. Following, a few favorites:

Winter Lights at the North Carolina Arboretum

Open evenings from mid November through Dec. 31, Winter Lights is an outdoor holiday light exhibit placed throughout The North Carolina Arboretum’s gardens. Visitors can walk through a winter wonderland and enjoy uniquely lit displays and landscapes composed of nearly 500,000 energy-efficient LED lights. All tickets are date-specific and must be purchased in advance.

Christmas at the Biltmore Estate and Biltmore Village Lights

Beginning in early November, and running through early January, the Biltmore Estate takes on a magical glow. Across the estate, dozens of Christmas trees, thousands of lights and poinsettias, and miles of garland set the holiday scene. With a 35-foot live Fraser fir towering over the Banquet Hall, elegant decorations in platinum, gold, silver, and jewel tones adorn the grand spaces. In the evenings, visitors can enjoy Candlelight Christmas Evenings, replete with live music, candlelight and firelight. After visiting the estate, make a stop at Biltmore Village for a stroll through the shopping district’s dazzling display of lights for a truly wondrous Old-World holiday experience.

National Gingerbread House Competition at the Omni Grove Park Inn

Biltmore Asheville Holiday ActivitiesFor a quarter of a century, this highly anticipated gingerbread house competition has wowed thousands of visitors to the Omni Grove Park Inn. Held annually in late November, the competition features houses from all over the country. The winning creations are on display through early January, interspersed with glowing, elaborately decorated Christmas trees. Enjoy a commemorative cup of whipped-cream-topped hot cocoa as you take in the amazing array of gingerbread creations.

Buncombe County Festival of Lights at Lake Julian Park

Beginning the first of December and running until right before Christmas, this annual drive-through event transforms Lake Julian Park into a winter wonderland. The park is brightly lit with thousands of colored lights and more than 50 animated and stationary light displays. The road circling the park becomes a magical journey through tunnels of dazzling lights. Advance tickets can be purchased online.

Explore Holiday Lights in Downtown Asheville

Asheville Holiday LightsEnjoy a post-dinner feast for the eyes in downtown Asheville, where a lights display weaves through the trees in Pack Square and the surrounding streets. Historic buildings take on a festive veneer (don’t miss the fun façade of the Grove House) that adds even more magic to downtown’s architecture. Make a stop inside the Grove Arcade, where the grand hall becomes even more spectacular with added holiday sparkle and garlands.

For a personally guided tour of Asheville, or for information on real estate in the area, please contact Mike Figura at Mike@MyMosaicRealty.com or call him anytime at (828) 337-8190.